strongly typed language

strongly typed language

[′strȯŋ·lē ¦tīpt ′laŋ·gwij]
(control systems)
A high-level programming language in which the type of each variable must be declared at the beginning of the program, and the language itself then enforces rules concerning the manipulation of variables according to their types.
References in periodicals archive ?
C# is a strongly typed language, which illustrates the fact that all the variables are resolved at compile time.
Using a strongly typed language, developers simply specify the data logic that their application needs, and C-language source code implementing the exact data logic needed by their application, is generated.
Like C++, C# is a strongly typed language, and like C++, C# divides types into two sets: intrinsic (built-in) types offered by the language, and user-defined types that are defined by the programmer.
From the point of view of a strongly typed language, a class is a construct for implementing a user-defined type.
In a strongly typed language, the dynamic type of an object reference is constrained by the programmer-defined class inheritance hierarchies in that system.
Ada, as a strongly typed language, will catch all such errors, while the current generation of C compilers will not.