structural-functionalism

structural-functionalism

  1. theoretical approaches in which societies are conceptualized as SOCIAL SYSTEMS, and particular features of SOCIAL STRUCTURES are explained in terms of their contribution to the maintenance of these systems, e.g. religious ritual explained in terms of the contribution it makes to social integration. As such, structural-functionalism can be seen as an alternative general term for FUNCTIONALISM. See also FUNCTION, FUNCTIONALIST) EXPLANATION.
  2. (more specifically) the particular form of functional analysis associated with Talcott PARSONS, often distinguished from ‘functionalism’ in general, as 'structural-functionalism’. Sometimes the work of the modern functionalist school in SOCIAL ANTHROPOLOGY, including RADCLIFFE-BROWN and MALINOWSKI, is also referred to by this term.
References in periodicals archive ?
ACCORDING to Google, 'structural-functionalism or, simply, functionalism, is 'a framework for building theory that sees society as a complex system whose parts work together to promote solidarity and stability'...This approach looks at both social structure and social functions.' Human societies and human civilization have never been a one-way traffic but has been an admixture of the good, the bad, and the ugly.
For Douglas, coming of intellectual age against the backdrop of the demise of structural-functionalism, it was important to maintain that the causal relationship between institution (structure) and culture (ideas) remained focused on how institutional forms shaped culture or thoughts, not the other way around.
Without a discussion of such issues, Forge's rather essentialist structural-functionalism risks being re-iterated.
On the contrary, he consistently traces the fault lines among Yaquis as they confronted the Spaniards, a major contribution to the anthropological literature on the Yoemem, which largely mirrors the structural-functionalism of Spicer's classic works.
In some ways the SIM model is concerned not with institutionalized theory groups like structural-functionalism or conflict theory, which represent the "normal science" Helmes-Hayes/Milne assume in their very language of "de-institutionalization", but in theorizing the marginalized movements often led by disaffected members of the disciplinary elite.
Structural-functionalism had been the dominant theoretical perspective in all of sociology, including health sociology in the 1950s and early 1960s.
At first, we would like to point out that the article, as you might have noticed, is just a brief attempt to establish a history of ideas of the Social Sciences, especially of Social Anthropology, in order to suggest a difference in the object that we thought has not been highlighted with the due emphasis by the historiographical tradition that focuses on the theme of structural-functionalism or systems theory, which is the problem of dynamics and social change.
However, structural-functionalism, with its emphasis on value consensus, social order, stability, and functional processes at the macro-level of society, had a short-lived period as the leading theoretical paradigm in health sociology.
The authors detail the weaknesses implicit in these research methods, keenly attributing these methods to the Chicago School, structural-functionalism, and elite clientelism.
Chapter topics include: foundational works on law and society (encompassing Cesare Beccaria and Herbert Spencer among others); the sociological movement in law; the Marxian, Weberian, Durkheimian, and Neo-Durkheimian perspectives; structural-functionalism; conflict theory; critical legal studies; and the theoretical orientations of the field at present.
Here, Boltanksi claims to inverse "classic historiography," but the framework of Mousnier's structural-functionalism undergirds this study's model of clientelism.
If the main ways of looking at Israel in the past few decades involved structural-functionalism and later conflict theories, this book represents what is still a rather minority view and that is of looking at Israel in cultural terms.