study

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Related to studied: genuinely, opposed, perplexed, impertinent

study

1. a drawing, sculpture, etc., executed for practice or in preparation for another work
2. a musical composition intended to develop one aspect of performing technique
3. Theatre a person who memorizes a part in the manner specified

study

A drawing executed as an educational exercise, produced as a preliminary to a final work or made record observations.
See also: Design drawing

study

1. A room or alcove of a house or apartment used primarily as a place for reading, writing, and study. It often embodies the features of a private office and private library.
2. A preliminary sketch or drawing to facilitate the development of a design.
References in periodicals archive ?
Services studied were from professionally led libraries
1990) studied more than six hundred individuals with newly diagnosed lung, breast, and colorectal cancer.
Because practice test results did not have any consequences on the final course grades of the preservice teachers, the variables studied here did not show stronger effects on the performance measure.
13) At the end of CBA I, the study team cautioned against comparing the benefit estimates across the five libraries studied.
Over the last decade, in fact, laboratory investigations of "implicit memory"--the unintentional retrieval of previously studied information on tests that do not ask for that information --have surged faster than Thomson's blood pressure on the day he was wrongly accused.
Metals other than A1 have also been studied for the relationship with AD but to a much lesser extent.
Library anxiety was first described and systematically studied by Constance Mellon (1986), and later defined as an uncomfortable feeling or emotional disposition characterized by tension, fear, a sense of uncertainty and helplessness, negative and self-defeating thoughts, and mental disorganization that appear only when students are in or contemplating a visit to the library (Jiao & others, 1996).
Corcoran-Perry and Graves (1990) studied supplemental information-seeking behavior of cardiovascular nurses.