styloglossus


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styloglossus

[‚stī·lō′gläs·əs]
(anatomy)
A muscle arising from the styloid process of the temporal bone, and inserted into the tongue.
References in periodicals archive ?
[12] The medial portion of the tongue where genioglossus is inserted moves in relation to lateral portion where styloglossus and hyoglossus are inserted.
Human tongue muscles are divided into two main groups: the extrinsic (genioglossus, styloglossus, and hyoglossus) and the intrinsic (superior longitudinal, inferior longitudinal, and the vertical and transverse) [6].
Coordinates are used to map the swallowing mechanics in the suprahyoid muscle group (#9 to the mandible [vectors #1 to #3) and in the thyrohyoid (#8 to #9), the stylopharyngeus (#7 to #3), the palatopharyngeus (#6 to #2), and the styloglossus and hyoglossus (#10 to #3) muscles.
Generally, the extrinsic muscles--including the genioglossus, the hyoglossus, the styloglossus, and the palatoglossus--tend to move the position of the whole tongue, while the intrinsic muscles change its shape.
The two main muscles responsible for the curling of tongue body are superior longitudinal muscle and styloglossus muscle [26].
Lim et al (70) evaluated the anatomy of the oropharynx and identified the key landmarks, including the glossopharyngeal nerve, styloglossus muscle, and external carotid artery, and explained that highlighting these key anatomic landmarks during training may help to shorten the learning curve of the TORS procedure.
(I suspect that what we are perceiving in this maneuver as the back of the throat is in fact activation of that lateral part of the tongue muscle group, the styloglossus, that retracts the back of the tongue.) If while inhaling we remap our concept of the back throat wall to its actual location in front of the ears, we will have fronted the tongue and opened the throat.
The mandibular gland shows a rounded contour and its duct crosses along the occiptomandibular face of the digastric muscle and styloglossus muscle and opens in the mouth on the sublingual caruncle near the frenulum (Figure 1 and 2).