Stylolite


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stylolite

[′stī·lə‚līt]
(geology)
An irregular surface, generally parallel to a bedding plane, in which small toothlike projections on one side of the surface fit into cavities of complementary shape on the other surface; interpreted to result diagenetically by pressure solution.

Stylolite

 

a type of feature encountered in sedimentary rocks wherein spinous or columnar projections on the surface of one layer fit into cavities of complementary shape on a second layer. In cross section, the stylolite surface suggests gear teeth in mesh. The columns can reach 1 m in length, and their sides are covered with striations parallel to the longitudinal axis. A clayey substance forms along the plane of the seam. Stylolites are often converted to sutures—zigzag seams with conical teeth. Stylolites occur in limestones and, more rarely, dolomites, coal, argillites, quartzites, gypsum, and other sedimentary formations.

REFERENCES

Kholodov, V. N. “K voprosu o proiskhozhdenii suturo-stilolitovykh shvov.” Izv. AN SSSR: Ser. geologicheskaia, 1955, no. 2.
Bushinskii, G. I. “O stilolitakh.” Izv. AN SSSR: Ser. geologicheskaia, 1961, no. 8.

stylolite

A jointed or irregular columnar structure occasionally found in beds of limestone, uniting the adjoining surfaces of two layers of rock.
References in periodicals archive ?
Group I veins usually crosscut compaction stylolites (Figure 2(a)) but are sometimes crosscut by the latter (Figure 2(b));
The stylolites, sutured and abraded grain contacts represent chemical dissolution of the rock material while silica overgrowth and dolomitization represents their reprecipitation along grain margins and fractures.
Jutana Formation is mainly characterized by, trough-, herring-bone-, hummocky- cross bedding at upper bedding planes and bedding parallel stylolites. Above the shale interval, there is dolomite which becomes fine grained and then gradually changes to dolomitic sandstone.
The movement along the plane of fracture is usually demonstrated by presence of some kind of the kinematic indicator (calcite steps, slickenlines, stylolites, etc.).
The stone is massive, but the thickness of extracted blocks is limited by stylolites.
In the limestones, pressure solution has resulted in the formation of stylolites (Figure 4D), while fenestral porosity (Figure 3C) formed as a result of the decay of organic material.
The appearance of stylolites in both ore and wall rock indicate that replacement may have been important.