subarctic climate


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subarctic climate

[¦səb′ärd·ik ′klī·mət]
(climatology)
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
It's the endpoint for the world-famous Iditarod sled dog race, a subarctic climate where temperatures barely creep into the double digits in winter and often plunge far below zero.
Overview of the tested climates City Country Climate Dubai UAE Desert, dry climate Istanbul Turkey Diverse climate Lima Peru Dry carid and semiaridal climate Moscow Russia Humid continental climate Nuuk Greenland Tundra climate Salvador Brazil Tropical rainforest climate Tokyo Japan Humid subtropical climate Tromso Norway Subarctic climate Table 2.
The cool subarctic climate patterns--little to no sunlight in the depths of winter, and midnight sun during the height of summer--inverts the cloud-to-season relationship.
To be able to survive Siberia's subarctic climate, characterised by long, usually very cold winters, and short, cool to mild summers, Amur tigers have thicker fur coats than tigers that live in southern Asia and a thick layer of fat to keep warm.
Detachment 1, 66th Training Squadron's Arctic Survival Training course, which began here recently, offers students a set of skills invaluable to enduring the subarctic climate of interior Alaska and the extreme cold.
Little is known, however, concerning the impact of the Subarctic climate on crop production.
The subarctic climate has extreme seasonal contrasts in temperature.
The subarctic climate of the study area has long cold winters and short cool summers with variable spring and fall seasons.
The Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta has a harsh subarctic climate. The Bering Sea brings extreme storms, hurricane force winds, heavy snow, rain, and extreme cold.
The region features a subarctic oceanic climate in the southwest and a continental subarctic climate farther north.
"In addition to being a critical issue," Hopkins says "it is difficult to meet those standards in a subarctic climate. With little wind at ground level during the winter, no real heat energy from the winter sun and the surrounding hills in the Fairbanks area, the most intense temperature inversions measured in North America create a "bowl of pollution," that doesn't move out."
As the multi-agency study conducted in Fairbanks last December concludes, "The extreme subarctic climate and temperature inversions present during a winter in Fairbanks may affect human exposure to gasoline and its combustion products in ways that are not well understood."