subatomic particle


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subatomic particle

[¦səb·ə′täm·ik ′pärd·ə·kəl]
(physics)
A particle which is smaller than an atom, namely, an elementary particle or an atomic nucleus.
References in periodicals archive ?
5) In quantum physics, a subatomic particle can disappear in one orbit and appear simultaneously in another orbit.
On the other hand, at the same time, this model introduces these new simple elements: the idea that space is a-temporal and has a granular structure at the Planck scale and the fact that the state of each subatomic particle can be always seen as the consequence of the vibration of one or more QS at appropriate frequencies.
What fascinates me about the wonderfully weird world of quantum mechanics (or quantum psychics) is how the behavior of subatomic particles of matter is able to explain certain psychic phenomena, which can't be explained by mainstream Western science.
One German molecular physicist told me many years ago that the subatomic particles being studied by physicists, using very strong microscopic instrument, behave very strangely.
When two subatomic particles are in a state of entanglement, they can be separated by billions of light-years, and yet be instantly affected by changes to the quantum state of the other.
While Americans spent part of Wednesday watching small explosions of color in the sky, an elite group of scientists spent the day announcing their conclusions from months of studying collisions of subatomic particles on colorful computer screens.
A subatomic particle can also move forward in time-faster than light, or backward, which is impossible under classical physics.
The Higgs boson is an important find because it answers the fundamental question of where mass comes from and completes the Standard Model of Physics, which describes much of what we know of the universe through the interactions of four fundamental forces and 12 subatomic particles.
The electron was the first subatomic particle (particle smaller than an atom) to be discovered.
The discovery of what appears to be a new subatomic particle with bizarre properties is challenging theorists' understanding of how matter behaves on the scale of protons and neutrons.