subfield


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subfield

[′səb‚fēld]
(mathematics)
A subset of a field which itself forms a field relative to the same operations.
A subfield (of sets) is any field (of sets) contained in some given field of sets.
References in periodicals archive ?
In addition, we learned from Ex Libris migration staff members that Symphony does not natively support retention of the analytic subfield when holdings are extracted.
The origin of surgery is particularly rooted in the treatment of injured participants of war and combat," and the subfield of neurosurgery emerged and rapidly developed as a result of twentieth-century wars (22).
An evaluator utilized Peng and Zhou (2006) categorization of subfields within ISM research in labeling the 10 subfield clusters and trends generated from the Nvivo clustering analysis.
To systematically understand the dynamics in each subfield of urban politics, we need to assess various capitals as an "energy of social physics" (Bourdieu, 1990, p.
The subfields tend to take different kinds of questions as their chief concern or look for answers with different sets of source material or approaches.
The timeframe was chosen to represent an era of rapid growth of the subfield. The literature search was conducted using the keyword "media ecology." Figure 1 visualizes the increase in the amount of academic activities in media ecology.
The partial correlation test was chosen to examine the relationship between hippocampal subfield volume and MoCA score, and age, sex, education level and TIV were imported as covariates.
JW: MARBI (Machine-Readable Bibliographic Information) is taking care of the problem, establishing new fields, subfields and code values.
Unsurprisingly, many of the intellectual roots of multiagent systems research can be found in the field of distributed problem solving, and that subfield continues to be very active.
His research on the development of Christianity in China during the past 150 years helped to develop an entirely new subfield of modern Chinese history.
It is hardly surprising, then, that Buzan and Hansen use the first three chapters (out of eight substantive ones) somewhat defensively defining their view of this "subfield's" boundaries, key questions, and driving forces.