subglacial


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subglacial

[¦səb′glā·shəl]
(geology)
Pertaining to the area in or at the bottom of, or immediately beneath, a glacier.
References in periodicals archive ?
We chose to focus on the Aurora Subglacial Basin because it may represent the weak underbelly of the East Antarctic Ice Sheet, the largest remaining body of ice and potential source of sea-level rise on Earth," said Donald Blankenship, principal investigator for the ICECAP project, a multinational collaboration using airborne geophysical instruments to study the ice sheet.
Subglacial erosion and englacial sediment transport modelled for North American ice sheets.
That water quickly accumulated at the base of the underlying ice sheet, forming a subglacial lake that drained away during the following 24 hours.
in subglacial environment) (Raukas & Stankowski 2005) or with the deposits of an ice lake at the end of the late Pleistocene, when the ice margin had reached either the Gulf of Finland or already South Finland (Miidel 2003).
The high activity level indicates that the source is riverine or lacustrine, as we would expect, given the glociofluvial sediment supply emanating from the Sodalan Gletscher (as opposed to subglacial sediments or sediment near the ice margin).
For years we have speculated that new forms of microbial life could have evolved in the unique habitats of Antarctica's subglacial lakes," said microbiologist David Pearce in a statement from the British Arctic Survey, who is leading the search for creatures in the lake.
That's important, because understanding the subglacial plumbing helps scientists determine what will happen to the Antarctic ice sheet as global warming intensifies.
Scientists can also more easily discern the rise and fall of the surfaces of ice sheets due to the flow of water into and out of subglacial lakes (SN: 3/3/07, p.
1990:39-40), about elderly men who made subglacial journeys, prepared to sacrifice their lives to benefit their descendants.
Unlike previous lake maps, which are confined to small regions, Joughin and colleagues mapped 124 subglacial lakes across Antarctica using lasers on NASA's ICESat satellite.
Ocean tides produce daily and weekly variations in flow speed at some locations, while the draining and filling of subglacial lakes and the climate cycles, such as ice ages, appear to cause variations over decades, centuries, or millennia.