subglacial


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subglacial

[¦səb′glā·shəl]
(geology)
Pertaining to the area in or at the bottom of, or immediately beneath, a glacier.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
'This has implications on how we understand subglacial weathering processes and the export of nutrients from glacial environments.'
The finding, as the researchers described, is similar to subglacial lakes discovered several kilometers below the ice in Arctic and Antarctica.
The researchers said it could take years to verify whether something is actually living in this body of water that resembles a subglacial lake on Earth, perhaps with a future mission drilling through the ice to sample the water below.
The findings come after news that a team led by Northumbria University has discovered mountain ranges and three huge, deep subglacial valleys in an airborne survey of the South Pole region.
Subglacial till formation: microscale processes within the subglacial shear zone.
Bea et al., this research used the reactive transport code Par-MIN3P-THCm in order to perform an informed, illustrative set of simulations assessing the depth of penetration of low salinity, [O.sub.2]-rich, subglacial recharge.
Glacial tunnel valleys are erosional features formed by rapid expulsion of subglacial meltwater, which can incise down into bedrock.
Characteristic minerals resulting from such subglacial volcanism on Earth include zeolites, sulfates and clays.
Palmer and colleagues studied the flow paths of a lake below the ice sheet that drained in 2011 and found that a subglacial tunnel drains the lake--a mechanism that has been observed in Antarctic glaciers but never before in Greenland.
This led to the discovery that neutrino annihilation is capable of targeting 4s electrons in hcp-Fe, a phase transition in iron providing a natural thermoregulation mechanism as the 4s electrons transfer to the 3d subshell, assuring that the thermal flux through a subglacial ocean is essentially independent of planetary mass for relatively dense, rocky planets [3,10].