subhedral


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subhedral

[¦səb¦hē·drəl]
(mineralogy)
Pertaining to an individual mineral crystal that is partly bounded by its own crystal faces and partly bounded by surfaces formed against preexisting crystals.
Descriptive of a crystal having partially developed crystal faces.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
In Figure 5, there are particles with crystalline habit of the subhedral to euhedral type with well-defined plans; these could correspond to kaolinite (Figure 5(a)), dickite (Figure 5(b)), and illite (Figure 5(c)) in aggregate form.
The zircon crystals occur as subhedral to euhedral grains up to 100 [micro]m in diameter that mostly are in contact with other accessory minerals, such as Fe-Ti oxides, apatite, and xenotime, and exhibit oscillatory zoning (Fig.
Hence, this subhedral zircon is more complicated to interpret (see below).
The coarse fraction of the samples was composed of euhedral and subhedral angular grains, mainly quartz, feldspars and plagioclases, with a small proportion of shards of acid volcanic glass, phytoliths, and mica and pyroxene grains.
The plagioclases are euhedral to subhedral that show evidences of fracture and breakage.
Pyrolusite minerals develop in small veins and characteristic with anhedral and subhedral cutaways.
Minor disseminated subhedral to euhedral magnetites are common in the area, dominantly appears in chlorite-schist (Figure 3(d)).
One is in the form of subhedral to euhedral crystals and second is in the form of intraclasts of dolomite.