subjective

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subjective

1. existing only as perceived and not as a thing in itself
2. Med (of a symptom, condition, etc.) experienced only by the patient and incapable of being recognized or studied by anyone else
References in periodicals archive ?
First, the input parameters used in our experiments were selected over a relatively small sample space and the decisions on the "optimal" parameters were subject to human subjectiveness. Although it is almost impossible to identify the absolutely optimal input parameters for each edge detector [20], the choice of optimal input parameters may be improved by conducting a large number of experiments and averaging opinions from more expert viewers.
Linguistic terms have been found intuitively easy to use in expressing the subjectiveness and imprecision of risk assessments [3, 23].
The present study aimed to address some of this subjectiveness by using neuro-imaging markers to assess structural changes in the brain and examine the relationship with Mediterranean diet adherence.
In Victorian fiction, a principal female character's subjectiveness is established via her dress.
First, to decide if an interest is "compelling" requires one to subjectively assess the interest's worth, and second, the subjectiveness is exacerbated by the failure of the Supreme Court and Congress to define what "compelling governmental interest" means (143)--aside from being an "interest of the highest order," (144) the term is standardless.
(100) The Eighth Circuit previously noted that "[it] has yet to establish a clear standard for pretrial detainees." (101) The Walton court determined that municipal liability on a deliberate indifference theory is purely objective and may be sufficiently premised on "obviousness or constructive notice." (102) Due to the myriad of inconsistencies in applying the deliberate indifference theory to Fourteenth Amendment claims, a circuit split developed as to whether the correct standard is one of objectiveness or subjectiveness in this context.
These are much safer claims to file than a discrimination claim because there is less subjectiveness, fewer unknowns about the claims, and a more likely chance to survive a summary judgment motion even in weak cases.
Both in early journal entries and early articles one can find a concern with the 'I,' subjectivity, and what Kierkegaard would characterize as "inwardness." The distractions of the social "turbid present" incline one to "isolation." The genius--or anyone devoted to creative projects--"must stand on his glass tripod, if he would keep his electricity." (47) Though "vicious subjectiveness" is eschewed, the turning of the eye from objects toward "the subject or mind" is fruitful, as in the "modern literature" Emerson surveys and classifies as indicating a subjective age.
Despite appropriate efforts are taken to control subjectiveness of the responses of faculty members using validity and reliability methods presence of subjectiveness in the responses of the faculty members cannot be ignored.
Certainly, such a target is always exposed to dynamics and the inherent subjectiveness of politics and political confrontation.
In order to predict the healing characteristics of the composite accommodating the subjectiveness of the sample geometry and the possible wide-ranging applications, the temperature results from these experiments are used to predict the temperature profile in the sample.
However, this subjectiveness is difficult to develop and only identified emergency patients tend to benefit.