subliminal

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subliminal

1. resulting from processes of which the individual is not aware
2. (of stimuli) less than the minimum intensity or duration required to elicit a response

subliminal

[sə′blim·ə·nəl]
(physiology)
Below the threshold of responsiveness, consciousness, or sensation to a stimulus.
References in periodicals archive ?
This case offered Fergie the chance to curry favour with referees and so subliminally encourage them to give more decisions to United
Either in your face or subliminally, the key shout has always been to promote and propagate women as the frontrunner of household decisions.
By tapping into the sinister techniques of neuro-linguistic programming, the president subliminally convinced Americans to elect him--and who knows what he'll make us do next?
Waitrose executive chef Neil Nugent says: "It is a well-known theory that hemlines reflect the economy, but what has not been recognised until now is that our eating habits subliminally mirror the fiscal way of the world too.
Their latest single harks back yet again to the classic Seventies MOR sound of the likes of Supertramp and has been subliminally advertised on TV as the music for the current Toyota Arius commercial.
People subliminally accept the idea that Italian Americans are either crooks and/or low-class.
Can subliminally presented images influence the persuasive quality of messages presented to subjects?
Participants then performed a computer-based activity during which the name of one or the other of these people was repeatedly, but subliminally, flashed on the screen.
He added: "There are many junior officers who will feel their careers are being threatened subliminally.
While writing an October 4 article on a court decision in favor of a newsletter editor, we must have been subliminally affected by the harvest season.
Perhaps more important than details of substance and artistic techniques is Mlinar's ability to subliminally communicate mood and atmosphere.
What sparked my curiosity after a good read (no doubt subliminally familiar from Nieman lectures) is that it ended abruptly just when it got to the watchdog role of the press.