suboptimization


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suboptimization

[¦səb‚äp·tə·mə′zā·shən]
(systems engineering)
The process of fulfilling or optimizing some chosen objective which is an integral part of a broader objective; usually the broad objective and lower-level objective are different.
References in periodicals archive ?
From Lemmas 1, 2, and 3, given a value of p*, we can iteratively determine the optimal values of (l*, [alpha]*, [beta]*, [lambda]*) using the bisection search method or the Golden section method in the four single variable suboptimization problems that are decoupled from the original problem in terms of l, [alpha], [beta], and [lambda] [23].
BMCC is limited compared to WPC because it is material oriented; it doesn't consider the operation phase of the building, which may lead to suboptimization problems.
It is well established in the literature that (1) companies are better off when collaborating and integrating with their supply chain partners, (2) performance measurement systems should be carefully designed to avoid suboptimization, and (3) quality is a powerful strategic tool to achieve competitive advantages (Towill 1996, Mason-Jones and Towill 1997, Berry et al.
63) This results in suboptimization or an overemphasis on a particular metric that ignores the actual root cause of the core problem and may in fact exacerbate the problem.
But as long as the pressure for internalisation rises steadily our basic premise holds that the total suboptimization area diminishes with the number of internalisation steps.
79) Of note, metrics having no influence on improving core value-stream operational excellence or those enabling suboptimization are eliminated.
Suboptimization and contextual relationships must be evaluated.
Further, there is a suboptimization involved in determining how the cooling tower fan needs to be operated in order to minimize the combined performance of both the chiller and the cooling tower.
Such an appreciation would generate a deeper understanding of the web of influencing factors associated with the decision problem and thereby serve to minimize the risk of suboptimization associated with the ontological dilemma.
Because the systems have been designed and fielded to solve parochial information requirements with little thought to the DOD global supply chain, they are a prime example of suboptimization, in which overemphasis of a portion of the supply chain enables it to perform better at the expense of the larger, more important total system.
Blaming each other in times of tension will only result in suboptimization, or an emphasis on achieving individual goals rather than overall mission (Bolman & Deal, 2003).