subrogation


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Financial, Acronyms, Wikipedia.

subrogation

The substitution of one person for another with respect to legal rights such as a right of recovery; occurs when a third person, such as an insurance company, has paid a debt of another or claim against another and succeeds to all legal rights which the debtor or person against whom the claim was asserted may have against other persons.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Murphy, the appellate court reviewed the trial court's order, dismissing the plaintiff's property damage subrogation claim against defendant tenants for failing to state a claim entitling it to relief.
Missouri prohibits health plan subrogation clauses.
In the subrogation context, both the insurer/subrogee and the insured/subrogor should implement a litigation hold with the assistance of the adjuster or subrogation professional.
5(f)(4)(E) addresses the resolution of medical liens and subrogation claims that are directly related to the underlying personal injury or wrongful death case.
The AIA contract waives subrogation rights for all "damages caused by fire or other perils to the extent covered by property insurance.
Or do they instead show that the general principle is that real subrogation does not operate, unless there is such specific authority?
Subrogation was allowed supported by the following analysis:
Being able to conduct subrogation activities online has proven to be a money saver.
Keeping the House's subrogation provision would let insurers take money that was intended to cover injured patients' future medical expenses and to compensate the patients for lost wages, according to Kennedy.
Subrogation is solely the right of the insurer, not the policyholder.
Companies with aggressive subrogation programs can expect to recover upwards of 5% to 20% of the losses they sustain.