Subshrubs


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Subshrubs

 

low-growing plants (5-60 cm tall) with lignified perennial, usually profusely branched shoots and no clearly expressed main trunk. Subshrubs often have a long rootstock (for example, bilberry and mountain cranberry); some have creeping shoots (cranberry). Sometimes, particularly in the high mountains, subshrubs assume a pulvinate form (Diapensia lap-ponica). The principal aboveground shoots live five to ten years. Subshrubs predominate in the vegetation cover of the tundras (species of birch and willow and many Ericaceae); they sometimes form a solid layer in coniferous forests. Subshrubs predominate in sphagnum marshes (cranberry, bog whortleberry, marsh andromeda, leatherleaf, and rhododendron) and form the vegetation of such wastelands as the heaths in Western Europe. They grow in the high mountains of South America, South Africa, and New Zealand, as well as in the Pamirs.


Subshrubs

 

perennial plants in which the lower parts of the shoots bearing the renewal buds become woody and live for several years while the upper parts remain grassy and die each year (unlike in shrubs and undershrubs). Subshrubs are usually not more than 80 cm high; in rare cases they reach a height of 150–200 cm. They differ from perennial grasses in that their renewal buds are normally several centimeters above the ground. Subshrubs are found primarily in arid regions. The position of the buds above the ground protects them from overheating in the scorching soil. Examples of subshrubs are Ceratoides and many species of steppe and desert wormwoods, vetches, and saltworts (Halocnemum, Kalidium). An example of a particularly small subshrub is the creeping plant thyme.

References in periodicals archive ?
In this study, we observed two different stem types based on morphological and anatomical characters, which are related to the habit type: type 1, typical of caulirosula plants, and type 2, characteristic of other habits--shrubs, subshrubs, trees, and treelets.
In the Brazilian cerrado, fire appears to stimulate flowering of the grass and subshrub layers (Munhoz and Felfili, 2005; 2007) but to inhibit the reproduction of woody plants (Hoffmann, 1998; Felfili et al., 1999).
Subshrubs erect, little branched until 0.8 m tall; cylindrical branches, straight, epidermis striated longitudinally, green-vinaceous on the young branches, purple on the old branches.
In the Chihuahuan Desert, these grass-dominated communities have characteristic shrub and subshrub components, which following the conventions and descriptions of the U.S.
The plot sizes were 5 m by 5 m for shrubs and 2 m by 2 m for small subshrubs and herbaceous plants because the individual subshrubs are very small and present uniform distribution.
Weed designates species common as agricultural weeds Habit denotes growth habit (A = annual, B = biennial, C = herbaceous perennial, S = shrub, SS = subshrub, T = tree) Origin refers to the geographic area where the species is native (A = Asia, AU = Australia, C = circumboreal, E = Europe, EA = Eurasia, EAF = Eurasia and northern Africa, NA = North America, SA = South America, W = cosmopolitan) First Wo.
Galphimia is a genus of perennial herbs, subshrubs, shrubs, and small trees, occurring throughout Mexico in diverse habitats, both dry and mesic.
Early planting time causes more aggregative absorption of solar radiation and thermal units by plant which leads to height, subshrub and leaf number and consequently biological yield increases.
Characteristics of microhabitat use by the animals were recorded every 15 cm along the path, recording bare soil, litter, trees, shrubs, subshrubs, or herbs intercepting a vertical stick 1.5 m long.
Wild Flowers of Japan, Herbaceous Plants (including Dwarf Subshrubs).
Carolyn Singer, University of California lifetime Master Gardener and author of Deer in My Garden, Volume 1: Perennials & Subshrubs (Garden Wisdom Press, 2006; $20; www.gardenwisdompress.com), has been designing gardens in Northern California deer country for 30 years and advises planting these warm-season bloomers that deer ignore: Erigeron karvinskianus, 'Moonshine' yarrow, Russian sage (Perovskia), santolina, and Spanish and English lavender.