subsidiarity


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subsidiarity

1. (in the Roman Catholic Church) a principle of social doctrine that all social bodies exist for the sake of the individual so that what individuals are able to do, society should not take over, and what small societies can do, larger societies should not take over
2. (in political systems) the principle of devolving decisions to the lowest practical level
References in periodicals archive ?
Subsidiarity in practice, implies a new kind of local policy and administrative leadership and utilization of new conceptual tools to aid the local authority to rigorously examine and exploit its internal strengths.
But he added: "It was only on December 1 last year, with the Act coming into force that national Parliaments were granted the right to give in a reasoned opinion their view that a particular proposal for EU legislation did not comply with the principle of subsidiarity."
In the Catholic Church's Encyclical Quadragesimo Anno, The Principle of Subsidiarity 'Is indicated as a most important principle of 'social philosophy!'.
Subsidiarity helps us think about how to organize political communities.
Subsidiarity and proportionality are the quintessential constitutional principles and rules in European Union law governing the exercise of European Union competence in ares of shared competence, says Shaw, but the Court of Justice of the European Union has failed to engage with them as a tool of judicial review when interpreting cases in shared policy areas involving the residence rights of European Union citizens who are economically inactive.
The principle of Subsidiarity is the basis for federalism." So I asked him to email me a longer comment on subsidiarity.
In light of this question, let us now turn to the principle of subsidiarity as a means of providing a compromise between unity and diversity.
"If there is a violation of the principle of subsidiarity," Yu points out, "there is also a violation of the common good.
2) and has two different attitudes: vertical subsidiarity (also known as institutional), acting among public authorities, and horizontal subsidiarity (also known as social), acting between public institutions and individuals.
One principle often put forward in this context is "subsidiarity." (1) Subsidiarity is typically understood as a presumption for local-level decisionmaking, which allows for the centralization of powers only for particular, good reasons.