substellar object


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substellar object

[‚səb‚stel·ər ′äb‚jekt]
(astronomy)
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Two coplanar, substellar objects orbiting within 3 a.
In the meantime, the flood of new discoveries and follow-up observations will teach astronomers a great deal about the diversity of substellar objects and the formation and commonality of planets.
Such direct measurements will enable astronomers to test the cooling models that are used to derive masses of substellar objects indirectly, based on the objects' ages and luminosities.
These results, along with the recent discovery of a young binary brown dwarf (see page 22), bolster the view that substellar objects form in the same manner as stars and are not ejected embryos.
Such a nearby trophy offers astronomers "a new benchmark in the study of substellar objects, amenable to a wide range of detailed atmospheric and chemical observations," write its discoverers in a paper to appear in Astronomy & Astrophysics.
Some stellar specialists conclude that for now we are better off referring to these bodies as brown dwarfs, substellar objects that lack the mass to sustain hydrogen fusion in their cores.
Even dimmer and cooler beasts lie hidden in the stellar cellar, things labeled spectral classes L and T, which encompass substellar objects such as brown dwarfs.
If confirmed, the spectra would at least prove that the "planets" are substellar objects at the low end of the brown-dwarf mass range and not reddened background stars.
The year 1995 will likely be remembered by astronomers for the culmination of a 20-year hunt: the search for the substellar objects known as brown dwarfs.
As VB10's properties lie tantaliz-ingly close to those of brown dwarfs, Linsky suggests that flare activity be sought even among substellar objects.
A planet cannot sustain fusion of any sort, thus excluding large substellar objects such as brown dwarfs.