Substitution

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substitution

[‚səb·stə′tü·shən]
(psychology)
A defense mechanism whereby an unattainable or unacceptable goal, emotion, or object is replaced by one that is more attainable or acceptable.

Substitution

A material or process offered in lieu of, and equivalent to, the specified material or process.

Substitution

 

(law), in a will, the naming of a second heir, called a substitute heir. In Soviet law—for example, in Article 536 of the Civil Code of the RSFSR—a substitute heir can accede to an inheritance only if the first heir dies before the opening of the inheritance or does not accept the inheritance. In several other socialist countries, such as Hungary and Poland, legislation provides for substitution. In Poland, the law of inheritance allows substitution not only with respect to an heir ex testamento but also with respect to an heir ab intestato (art. 963 of the Civil Code).

substitution

A material or process offered in lieu of, and as being equivalent to, a specified material or process.

Substitution

Arsinoë
put her own son in place of Orestes; her son was killed and Orestes was saved. [Gk. Myth.: Zimmerman, 32]
Barabbas
robber freed in Christ’s stead. [N.T.: Matthew 27:15–18; Swed. Lit.: Barabbas]
Canty, Tom
young beggar takes to throne in prince’s stead. [Am. Lit.: The Prince and the Pauper]
Edward, Prince of Wales
kingling becomes urchin in clothing exchange. [Am. Lit.: The Prince and the Pauper]
George, Tobey
after Marcus’s death, replaces him in his family. [Am. Lit.: The Human Comedy]
Hagar
thinking herself barren, Sarah offers slave to Abraham. [O.T.: Genesis 16:1–4]
Leah
deceptively substituted for Rachel in Jacob’s bed. [O.T.: Genesis 29:22–25]
whipping boy
surrogate sufferer for delinquent prince. [Eur. Hist.: Brewer Note-Book, 942]
References in periodicals archive ?
Finally, Part VI explores one significant implication of recognising the distinction between substitutionary and compensatory contractual money awards that was of particular relevance in Clark v Macourt: the status of the so-called 'avoided loss rule of mitigation.
The Son must also voluntarily take on this task, exercising his own free will to offer himself as a substitutionary sacrifice which satisfies divine justice.
Mohler also gave some context on why penal substitutionary atonement matters to Southern Baptists.
In my view, by holding on to some form of a substitutionary expiation theory that deals with universal sin and divine justice in combination with divine love, Girard's theory deserves a place under the atonement theory tent.
Certain understandings of objectivity tend to think of epistemic authority only in the substitutionary role.
But, what exactly happens in this substitutionary atonement rightly remains open to theological explanation.
Most econometric and demographic studies tend to indicate that skill sets possessed by undocumented immigrants in our heterogeneous labor market are more complementary than substitutionary.
When litigation complements existing regulatory policy, an increase in transnational litigation may have a substitutionary effect.
Grappling at length with the rigorous sacrificial system detailed in Leviticus, Harrell drives home the extent to which Jesus functions as a substitutionary sacrifice in Christianity, although he and his cohorts observe the laws of Leviticus haphazardly.
But my main criticism is not that they did too much with the substitutionary and transactional themes in the doctrine of the atonement, but that they did too little.
According to him, the restriction deprives the workers and employees from their right to physically have a vacation or its substitutionary monetary compensation when terminating an employment.
Here, Rossetti recognizes that even Scripture itself exercises Reserve, since it can "darkly" and "negative[ly]" affirm the "Divine Mystery" of the substitutionary atonement, in which Christ, through his death and descent into hell ("making his grave with the wicked"), propitiates the just wrath of God.