suburban

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suburban

1. of, relating to, situated in, or inhabiting a suburb or the suburbs
2. characteristic of or typifying a suburb or the suburbs
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Note, however, that the case studies here focused on highly populated urban areas (counties with over 1 million residents)--thus, to assess generalizability, further studies must confirm whether these findings hold true for rural and suburbanizing NIMs.
(35) For instance, his development of the modern, multi-use Mile High Center in downtown Denver, completed in 1956, was about revitalizing a "dry-rotted core" of a rapidly suburbanizing city.
Dioceses were forced to take on more of the financial burden of operating urban parish schools at the same time that they were obligated to build new schools to serve suburbanizing Catholics.
A Zionist ethos would keep the Reform movement from becoming a "kind of obscure sect in American Jewry with very little influence or appeal," he argued, setting his sights on the newly suburbanizing Jewish masses.
"We have no interest whatsoever in suburbanizing Worcester Magazine."
"It's gotten so bizarre," says photographer Nina Berman of northern Virginia's rapidly suburbanizing Loudoun County.
In the latter part of the twentieth century, job location followed population in suburbanizing, so much so that metropolitan areas can often be characterized as containing several large employment centers dispersed throughout the metropolitan area.
In the Atlanta region, for example, the majority of the black middle-class is located far from the central city and is moving south while the best jobs, economic opportunities and schools are moving north.(150) The "[b]lack middle-class is suburbanizing in one direction and th[e] jobs and economic growth are suburbanizing in another....
If, as Elfenbein argues, Cowper is at once beloved of the suburbanizing classes in the early nineteenth century, yet construed as either mad or a hermaphrodite, perhaps these classes wished to identify themselves with or incorporate the distinctiveness he represented, if only in a somewhat distanced or normalized manner, in part to craft the notion of the unique modern individual.
Like the downtown, Kitchener's core neighbourhoods fared poorly in the early suburbanizing years.
Conflict at the rural/urban interface: mushroom farms and composting in a suburbanizing environment.
The socially, economically, and geographically diverse county is rapidly suburbanizing, with only its western portion retaining a considerably rural flavor.