subversive

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subversive

1. liable to subvert or overthrow a government, legally constituted institution, etc.
2. a person engaged in subversive activities, etc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Through these essays, readers meet subversively lunching ladies in Ontario and African American home demonstration agents in Arkansas.
This burning of the books was one of the very first acts of the Nazis, carried out in May 1933, in order to destroy any book "which acts subversively on our future or strikes at the root of German thought."
In King's far more subversively elastic domain, these anthropomorphic bodies serve as stand-ins for a disquieting sense of repression and rebellion.
Headstone, on the other hand, uses his skills of "memorization and copying" more subversively to stalk Eugene Wrayburn disguised as Rogue Riderhood, and as a result is eventually punished for it (103, 108).
After experimenting with Pop Art early on, Khakhar moved on to develop his own idiosyncratic style of painting that combined seeming opposites such as high and mass culture, everyday life and historical painting, thus subversively undermining existing iconography.
There's plenty to read and look at, which makes it a great place to subversively get Indian expatriate children interested in Indian history.
For instance, in chapter six, Cowart argues that Powers follows in Pynchon's footsteps by subversively weaving fairy tale into his Operation Wandering Soul, yet keeps the style innovative nonetheless (91).
The bills language attempted to "uproot" HBCUs and, subversively, remove a piece of their identity and increase the stress on already stressed institutions.
On the cover is the subversively worded and deliberately darkened subtitle, "Escape from Twilight Zones." Boyce Davies writes of English departments as often comprising "hearts of whiteness" with "an underlying set of colonial narratives that only the embedded know" (p.
Clive Wolfendale, chief executive of CAIS, the parent company of Living Room Cardiff, said: "The electronic manifestation of this menace has found its way, almost subversively, on to our high streets, television screens and smart phones.
This, her debut record is repackaged from its Francophone original for an Anglophone audience and sees Letissier return to her days stalking the subversively glamorous clubs of Soho, tackling gender identity.
All of which suggests, with Rogen following "This Is the End" (which he also co-wrote with Goldberg) with this film, that the multihyphenate may be the most subversively sincere religious allegorist working in movies today.