subversion

(redirected from subvert)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Wikipedia.

subversion

1. the act or an instance of subverting or overthrowing a legally constituted government, institution, etc.
2. the state of being subverted; destruction or ruin
3. something that brings about an overthrow
References in periodicals archive ?
He urged efforts to counter plots to undermine social fabric and subvert security .
In an urgent meeting held yesterday, it warned Iran against any attempt to subvert Bahrain's security and stability.
Takingplace monthly at Revolution on the Albert Dock, Subvert welcomes the legendary Plump DJs on Saturday, November 2.
A HUNGER striking prisoner is trying to subvert the law by pressurising the state and public opinion, the High Court heard yesterday.
Arnold Schwarzenegger has vetoed two bills that some local parents, pastors, educators and elected officials said were attempts to advance a gay agenda and subvert parents' moral authority over their children.
Or maybe it would be good just to sell your car and walk to church or subvert the power structures by having children preside over communion.
Yet Kozol's most destructive legacy may turn out to be his attempts to convince classroom teachers that their proper role is to subvert mainstream American beliefs.
Finally, more detailed papers discuss how viruses subvert the humoral immune response, the interaction between viruses and dendritic cells, and the subversion mechanisms of the measles virus.
Creating a "Chinese wall" in North America will subvert any effort to gain a larger share of a market which still has the biggest growth potential of any market in the world.
Those terms "will not reach many great and dangerous offenses," Mason said, including "attempts to subvert the Constitution.
Second, it advocates subverting the Constitution in much the same manner that anti-gun people subvert it--through interpreting it however they feel they must in order to meet their present goals.
But the artist has introduced certain divergent notes, points of irony that subvert his assumed distance from the subject.