subversion

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subversion

1. the act or an instance of subverting or overthrowing a legally constituted government, institution, etc.
2. the state of being subverted; destruction or ruin
3. something that brings about an overthrow
References in periodicals archive ?
A SHOW has indisputably reached classic status when the mere premise of an episode evinces laughs, when the characters have been so vividly realized that simply imagining them in a situation is funny - and then the episode manages to subvert your expectations for even greater laughs.
Shelley added: "We do not know why individuals would attempt to skirt campaign contribution laws, hide the source of these from us, or subvert the political process.
In addition, he said, such laws create inequities among newer and long-term renters and subvert the free-market principles of supply and demand.
Referring to Italian Communist Antonio Gramsci, who urged his disciples to subvert the key institutions of society, Walzer noted that since the 1960s cultural Marxists have focused on "winning the Gramscian war of position.
In its lawsuit against Rambus, the FTC has alleged that Rambus intentionally deceived others in the DRAM industry, including Micron, to subvert an open-industry standard-setting organization known as JEDEC.
Eventually the animals' intelligent and power-loving leaders, the pigs, subvert the revolution and form a dictatorship more oppressive and heartless than that of their former human masters.
In the collective imagination lipstick represents romanticism and sensuality, and it should come as no surprise that various artists have used its image in their work to subvert those very notions.
Eventually, the animals' intelligent and power-loving leaders - the pigs - subvert the revolution and form a dictatorship more oppressive and heartless than that of their former human masters.
The move by Senate Democrats is an attempt to subvert the judicial nomination process," said Jay Sekulow, Chief Counsel of the ACLJ.
It was, if nothing else, the harsh realization the council cannot subvert charter reform forever.