sucrosic

sucrosic

[sü′krō·sik]
(petrology)
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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On the other hand, the K4 dolomites are thin alternations of mudstone-wackstone with packstone-grainstone, light brown, light brownish gray to gray, moderately hard to hard, cryptocrystalline to microcrystalline, locally crystalline, brittle, sucrosic, traced with pelloids and oolites, locally argillaceous and carbonaceous and characterized by good visible porosity.
Very finely to coarse-crystalline dolostones alternate, containing vuggy intervals which often have sucrosic texture (Fig.
For sucrosic dolomites (type 4) 13 measurements of stable isotopes were made (Table 3).
Sucrosic dolomites, typical of the Upper Pskov unit (Figs 3D, 6D, 10, Table 2), are distinguished as type 4 dolomites, which have a complicated diagenetic history.
Shallow-burial dolomite cement: a major component of many ancient sucrosic dolomites.
The subjacent interval includes a gray color sucrosic dolostone with very closely spaced vertical joints, similar to the interval in the Reeves Cave entrance profile.
The gangue mineralogy of the massive sulfides tends to be sucrosic silica.
The drilled Deep Galicia Margin sediment successions of Sites 637 to 641 start in the Tithonian with limestones containing sandstone and claystone interbeds followed by dolomitized platform carbonates with marly beds as well as low-relief biohermal mounds and overlain by Early Berriasian sucrosic dolomite possibly deposited as shallow marine echinoid-ooid-skeletal grainstone and packstone.
Petrographic analysis suggests that two phases of dolomite precipitation are present: the first consists of a fine-grained, fabric-destructive cement that probably accompanied early burial; the second is a fine- to medium-grained, locally sucrosic dolomite that is interpreted to have precipitated during later burial.