suction

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suction

1. the force or condition produced by a pressure difference, as the force holding a suction cap onto a surface
2. the act or process of producing such a force or condition
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

suction

1. In plastering, the absorption of water from a plaster finish coat by the base coat (or the base, such as block or gypsum lath), thus providing a better bond and causing it to adhere to the base coat.
2. The adhesion of mortar to bricks.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Adjustment of depth under water surface of the suction tip: set at maximum noise level at 1000 mL/min.
The study has revealed that there is a high chance of culture growing a colonizer if the sample is obtained using suction tip instead of sputum sample.
Positioning the shaft so that it protrudes superiorly and anteriorly, versus just anteriorly in front of the patient's mouth, can also facilitate access of the HVE suction tip to the corner of the patient's mouth.
With simple instructions, users can bend metal suction tips to the exact angle needed for endoscopic examinations and surgery, enabling the physician to have a clear view through the endoscope.
Different types of fluid, different sized suction tubing, type of suction tip, surgeon's technique and preference and multiple other things will need to be considered when deciding the level of suction.
The middle turbinate is being retracted medially with a suction tip to improve visualization.
In order to ensure that adequate anesthesia has been attained, the tympanic membrane is touched with a suction tip. Any sign of pain necessitates a repeat application.
[1-3] The tip of an instrument can now be localized in real time to a computed tomography (CT) representation on a computer screen in the operating room with reasonable resolution.' The technique can be performed with a probe, a suction tip, or a microdebrider blade.2 Although this has not replaced the need for experience and a thorough knowledge of anatomy, the use of image-guided systems for endoscopic sinonasal surgery can help to educate the novice, give additional information to the experienced surgeon, and prevent orbital and intracranial complications.