summation sign

summation sign

[sə′mā·shən ‚sīn]
(mathematics)
A capital Greek sigma (Σ) that indicates the members of a set are to be added together, and has numbers below and above it indicating the range of values of an index that are to be included in the summation.
References in periodicals archive ?
say, where P(x) = P(x; [alpha]) is the residual function which is the sum of the residues of the generating function, [phi](s) to be defined below, with weights and we are to express the error term [DELTA](x; [delta]) in terms of special functions and where the prime on the summation sign means that the term corresponding to ([n.sub.1] + [[alpha].sub.1]) ...
where the prime over the summation sign indicates that the summation is over even values of r when n - 1 is even and over odd values of r when n - 1 is odd.
The summation sign seems to be missing from equation (2) for simple duration.
Take the summation sign over the first two growth rates and then over the next two rates on the right-hand side.
Also, if the summation sign appears without an index, by convention the index is understood to go from 1 to n, and we sum all the values of the variable.
However, where the summation sign is inserted into Equation 1 to make Equation 4 influences the component measures' construction.
In the second term of (12), relocate the summation sign inside the integral.
where [A.sub.[lambda]](x) = [A.sup.0.sub.[lambda]] (x) = [summation over ([[lambda].sub.k [less than or equal] x])]' '[[alpha].sub.k], and the prime on the summation sign means that when [[lambda].sub.k] = x, the correponding term is to be halved.
First, for the two terms preceding the summation signs, we have that [D.sub.a](x)C(x)[D.sub.b-1](x) [less than or equal to] [D.sub.a-1](x)C(x)[D.sub.b](x) since C(x) has non-negative coefficients, and by our induction hypothesis, [D.sub.a](x)[D.sub.b-1](x) [less than or equal to] [D.sub.a-1](x)[D.sub.b](x).
we cannot interchange the summation signs because the integral defining the sampling functions [[integral].sup.[infinity].sub.0] y(x, [[lambda].sub.n])y(x,[lambda])dx diverges if [lambda] [not equal to] [[lambda].sub.n] and so a Shannon type sampling theorem is not possible for [PW.sup.e].sub.[infinity]] without the knowledge of the type b.
Mordechai Gutman's surgical procedures report, the surgical summation signed by five of Dr.
where we sum over both i and j and require two summation signs. We sum over the rows first to obtain column totals and then add these to get the grand total.