summer noon

summer noon

[′səm·ər ′nün]
(astronomy)
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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Sharqiya, Egypt: It is a sizzling summer noon in Egypt's countryside.
"In the Middle East, even with the mandatory summer noon break for construction workers, labourers still encounter high temperatures and humidity," explained Lyndon Davies, the business unit (Middle East Corporate) and HSE director of Six Construct.
From the bass-heavy groove of "Low Key" to the gentle uplift of "Summer Noon," the album has a striking variety of styles and moods with thoughtful and poetic lyrics.
Rhetorical formulas like "serious", "important" issues of "very real concern" can occasionally bunch up with the crushing effect of a 45-degree Cypriot summer noon. And the book does not deal with the country's 2013 euro meltdown, although this, like the absent discussion of East Mediterranean natural gas, has so far made little difference to the politics of the Cyprus Problem.
Summer Noon with its sexy connotations - slinky violins, swooping oboe - caused a ripple of delighted gentle laughter, along with William Blakes' Fly swat from the percussionist, contrasting with Wordsworth's truly exquisite winter snowflakes, and neat quirky rhythms elsewhere.
"Love is Everywhere," "Ojala," "A Poet Gazes on the Moon," "Irish Love Song," "Deserted," "Betrayed," "Morning," "The Sky Ship," "The Jade Flute," "Ghosts," "The Sandman," "Evening," "Snowflakes," "A Song of the Spanish Gypsies," "Summer Noon," "My Lady Jacqueminot," "A Song of the Lilac," "Chime." Nonsense Rhymes and Pictures, opp.
Delicious dark red liquid poured all over, works like magic to lift our mood on a hot Summer noon. Some sweet shops in different areas of the Capital are well-known for their specialty with regard to Summer foodstuff.
The poet's use of repetitions, learned from Western poetry, is frequently quite effective, as in "Tree Shade," which uses the same verse to begin and end the four-stanza poem: "A shrine gate in the light, / elm trees tremble slightly; / a summer noon's green shade / soothes my remorse." When Nakahara looks carefully at something or someone outside himself, he seems to be most successful, as in the following stanza from "Song of die Sheep":

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