summer

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summer

1
1. 
a. the warmest season of the year, between spring and autumn, astronomically from the June solstice to the September equinox in the N hemisphere and at the opposite time of year in the S hemisphere
b. (as modifier): summer flowers
2. the period of hot weather associated with the summer

summer

2
1. a large horizontal beam or girder, esp one that supports floor joists
2. another name for lintel
3. a stone on the top of a column, pier, or wall that supports an arch or lintel

summer

[′səm·ər]
(astronomy)
The period from the summer solstice to the autumnal equinox; popularly and for most meteorological purposes, it is taken to include June through August in the Northern Hemisphere, and December through February in the Southern Hemisphere.

springer, skewback, summer

springer, 1: S
1. The impost or place where the vertical support for an arch

summer

summer, 4: S
1. A horizontal beam supporting the ends of floor joists or resting on posts and supporting the wall above; also called a summertree.
2. Any large timber or beam which serves as a bearing surface.
3. The lintel of a door or window; a breastsummer.
4. A stone laid on a column and serving as a support for construction above, as in the construction of an arch.

Summer

Aestas
personification of summer; portrayed as youthful and sprightly. [Rom. Myth.: LLEI, I: 322]
Ceres
goddess of the season. [Rom. Myth.: Hall, 130]
cricket
symbol of summer; weather prognosticator. [Insect Symbolism: Jobes, 382]
naked girl with fruit
personification of summer. [Art: Hall, 130]
sickle and sheaf of corn
representational of the season. [Art: Hall, 129]

SUMMER

String manipulation and pattern matching language by Klint & Sint at CWI in the late 1970s. It was recently used as the input and implementation language for the Dataflow Compiler Project at CWI.

["An Overview of the SUMMER Programming Language", Paul Klint, 7th POPL, ACM 1980, pp. 47-55].
References in classic literature ?
Then, through the long, bright summer hours Through sunshine and through shower, Together in their happy home Dwelt butterfly and flower.
In the hot summer light his floridness seemed heavy and bloated, and but for his erect square- shouldered walk he would have looked like an over-fed and over-dressed old man.
All were young and pretty, and bathed in summer bloom; but not one had the nymph- like ease of his wife, when, with tense muscles and happy frown, she bent her soul upon some feat of strength.
He knew that she had spent the previous summer at Newport, where she appeared to have gone a great deal into society, but that in the autumn she had suddenly sub-let the "perfect house" which Beaufort had been at such pains to find for her, and decided to establish herself in Washington.
Not too many people I know have accomplished as much in their lifetimes as I have in eighteen summers.
However, Northern Ontario Business has learned there are some questions surrounding this project and the proponent, Gordon Summers.
By Martin Summers (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2004.
Summers Only Music Education Degrees, Rochester, 6/27-8/5.
The NIEHS Summers of Discovery program was launched in 1989 as a way to give talented high school, undergraduate, and graduate students, as well as high school and college faculty, a more in-depth exposure to the world of scientific research.
In the last issue of The International Economy, respected Washington journalist Owen Ullmann wrote that Treasury Secretary Lawrence Summers has been less strident than his predecessor Robert Rubin in pressuring Japan to grow its economy: "Rubin worried that Japan's prolonged slump jeopardized the global economy, and he became increasingly frustrated by Tokyo's lack of action.
Opening his mouth to comment on the ongoing budget negotiations, Summers promptly inserted his wingtip, remarking that the interests pushing for a cut in the estate tax were motivated by "selfishness".