sump


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Acronyms, Wikipedia.
Related to sump: sump pit

sump

1. a receptacle, such as the lower part of the crankcase of an internal-combustion engine, into which liquids, esp lubricants, can drain to form a reservoir
2. Brit dialect a muddy pool or swamp
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

Sump

Reservoir or pit in the basement of a house into which water can drain, especially during flooding. A sump pump is used to pump collected water out of this reservoir to the sewer pipes.
Illustrated Dictionary of Architecture Copyright © 2012, 2002, 1998 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Sump

 

in mining, an underground working for the collection of surface and subterranean water so that it may be pumped away. The size of the sump is based on the amount of inflow during a period of ten to 12 hours with all drainage pumps shut down. Under emergency flow conditions in a mine, use is made of the additional capacity represented by the workings lying adjacent to the sump and below the pump chamber. The sump is divided by a cofferdam into two sections; when one is in operation, the other is drained.

As places where water accumulates during drainage, sumps are used in mines, subway tunnels, quarries, and elsewhere.

REFERENCE

Burovzryvnye raboty, pogruzka, kreplenie, rudnichnyi ventiliatsiia i vodootliv. Moscow, 1964.

V. A. POLUIANOV


Sump

 

(1) A storage vessel for collecting water that is placed in rock. Where deposits are worked by hydraulic mining, the hydraulic fluid is collected in a sump, for intake and pumping by a soil, coal, or sand pump.

(2) The part of a shaft situated below the level of the shaft bottom (sump or pit).

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

sump

[səmp]
(engineering)
A pit or tank which receives and temporarily stores drainage at the lowest point of a circulating or drainage system. Also known as sump pit.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

sump

1. A pit, tank, basin, or receptacle which receives sewage or liquid waste, located below the normal grade of the gravity system, and which must be emptied by mechanical means.
2. A reservoir sometimes forming part of a roof drain.
3. A depression in a roof deck where the roof drain is located.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

sump

i. A low point in an aircraft fuel tank or fuel system where water and other contaminants can collect and be held until they can be drained out. See baffle (i).
ii. A low point in an aircraft engine in which lubricating oil collects and is stored or transferred to an external tank for reuse. See oil sump.
An Illustrated Dictionary of Aviation Copyright © 2005 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved
References in periodicals archive ?
Instead, the water and sand is collected in sumps and recirculated through a filter press to press out all the moisture from the sand.
Water building up in the drain may be slowly working its way through the root mass and coming into the sump from its bottom instead of through the drain connection.
A water-powered backup pump uses water pressure to siphon water out of your sump. Most use l gallon of city water for every 2 gallons of sump water they remove.
They had the gruelling task of navigating eerie, water-filled abysses known as sumps and at one stage swam underwater in darkness for 600 metres in a 28-metre deep river.
The particular grade of Zytel used for the Scania oil sump is a 35% glass-fiber-reinforced, heat-stabilized and lubricated polyamide 66.
First is the center hole, which has approximately a 2.5-meter diameter, a depth of I meter, and a I-to 4-inch slope from the from of the circle to the back leading to the water sump. The second part is an ammunition pit that is roughly 1 meter behind the circle hole and is 2 meters x 1.5 meters.
However, they needed to redesign the oil sump to use the material, which meant that they needed to adopt new stamping tools.
The NRC began addressing the issue after large amounts of fibrous insulation were knocked off coolant pipes and collected in the sump, blocking recirculation.
According to DuPont, the rear section of the oil pan, which forms the sump for approximately six liters of oil, is very rigid because of its shape.
An efficient pump/skimmer can increase the life of the coolant from two months to a year, a reduction of five coolant changeouts per year per sump.