Cistaceae

(redirected from sun rose)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Wikipedia.
Related to sun rose: helianthemum, Cistaceae

Cistaceae

 

a family of dicotyledonous plants. They are shrubs, subshrubs, and herbs. The plants are often distinctively pubescent. The leaves are simple, generally opposite, and entire. The flowers are solitary or in racemes, usually bisexual, and regular. There are five sepals and five petals (less frequently, three of each); as a rule, there are many stamens. The gynoecia consist of five or three carpels (less frequently, there are up to ten). The ovary is superior. The fruit is a capsule. There are between six and eight genera, comprising approximately 180 species, distributed primarily in temperate regions of the northern hemisphere, especially in the Mediterranean region. In the USSR there are three genera (more than 20 species), found predominantly in dry, sunny places in the Caucasus. The most important genera of Cistaceae are Cistus and Helianthemum. Many species of Cistaceae are ornamentals.

REFERENCE

Hutchinson, J. The Genera of Flowering Plants, vol. 2. Oxford, 1967.
References in periodicals archive ?
They were joined in their celebrations by dancers from the Thieving Magpies, based in Marsden, dancing as the sun rose above the horizon.
After a sleepless vigil, cheers rang out at Salisbury Plain, as the sun rose over the Druid site at 04.58am.
Cheers rang out across Salisbury Plain in Wiltshire as the sun rose over the "heel" stone at 04.58am.
On June 8, 2004, the Sun rose over Huntington Beach State Park, South Carolina, where three of us were camped out, waiting.
Clouds hid the first rays as the sun rose over the ocean, but then the clouds parted, revealing a slowly moving beauty mark, the silhouette of Venus passing the face of the sun for the first time in 122 years.
When I was a small boy, my Black Country grandparents convinced me that not only was Dudley the 'Pearl of The Midlands' but that the sun rose and set there as well.
Never say "The sun rose, bright and shining." But, rather, "Bright and shining rose the sun."
The moment the sun rose, differential movement in the steel would make the great needles 'bend like bananas', says engineer Rocco Bressi.
If somebody remarks that the sun rose at six o'clock this morning, we know that he means to take note of the hour at which it first appeared above the horizon.
This is the post hoc, ergo propter hoc fallacy: The rooster crowed, the sun rose, so therefore the rooster caused the sun to rise.
As the sun rose high in the sky, the urgency of the mission heated up.
The sun rose with full potential as the climate became hot and humid afterwards.