sunscald


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sunscald

[′sən‚skȯld]
(plant pathology)
An injury to woody plants which results in local death of the plant tissues; in summer it is caused by excessive action of the sun's rays, in winter, by the great variation of temperature on the side of trees that is exposed to the sun in cold weather.
References in periodicals archive ?
Increased airflow can delay the onset of early and late blight, two common fungal diseases of tomatoes, but increased sunlight means sunscald could be more problematic.
Damage to a tree--such as wounds in a tree's outer bark from fire, sunscald, tunneling bark beetles, gnawing rodents or broken branches--are an inevitable part of its lifecycle.
Sunscald is especially troublesome on evergreens planted on the south side of a building.
Key words: bark colour, white birch, cambium temperatures, trembling aspen, sunscald, boreal forest, deciduous trees
Overpruning large trees can be extremely damaging, resulting in sunscald, decay, excessive sprouting, excess loss of the photosynthetic area, root decline, and even death.
In climates where searing sun regularly beats down on exposed, developing tomatoes, sunscald poses a definite concern.
A: Trees do not need to be shaded in this way (yarn bombing) to prevent sunscald.
Antitranspirant (also antidesiccant) A liquid sprayed on plants to reduce water loss, transplant shock, windburn, and sunscald.
Heading large-diameter branches often causes decay and cracks in the cut branch stubs and trunk, depletes energy reserves, causes sunscald on the trunk and branches, weakens roots, destroys the tree architecture and structure, causes vigorous sprouting, attracts boring insects, and wastes energy, because the removed branches have to be disposed of.