supercavitation


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supercavitation

[‚sü·pər‚kav·ə′ā·shən]
(fluid mechanics)
An extreme form of cavitation in which a single bubble of gas forms around an object moving rapidly through water, enveloping it almost completely so that the water wets very little of the object's surface, thereby drastically reducing viscous drag.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Longitudinal motion control of a high-speed supercavitation vehicle, Journal of Vibration & Control 13(2): 159-184.
Arndt, "Longitudinal motion control of a high-speed supercavitation vehicle," Journal of Vibration and Control, vol.
Semenenko, "Artificial supercavitation. physics and calculation," in Proceedings of RTO AVT Lecture Series on Supercavitating Flows, vol.
Owing to the broad application prospect in underwater drag reduction, the supercavitation has attracted significant attention from scholars all over the world [1-3], whereas a high number of numerical simulations and experiments have been conducted to study the mechanisms and laws of formation, the development, and the stabilization of the supercavitation [4-6].
This speed is a result of supercavitation: the torpedo is, in effect, flying in a gas bubble created by outward deflection of water by its specially shaped nose cone and the expansion of gases from its engine.
Researchers demonstrate the ability to use a process called "supercavitation" to propel subs through the ocean at rates up to the speed of sound.
A New Aeration Technology Using "Supercavitation", Recent Patents on Chemical Engineering 2: 176-180.
Topics include modeling and simulation as a biological flow coupled to deformable tissue and elastic structures, shockwave and bubble dynamics in various applications including biological treatments with experimental verification, multi-media flow or multi-phase flow and various applications (including cavitation and supercavitation), detonation problems, and Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids.
Dovell thinks fin and foils can be designed to create supercavitation.