superelevation


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Related to superelevation: centrifugal force

superelevation

[¦sü·pər‚el·ə′vā·shən]
(ordnance)
An added positive angle in antiaircraft gunnery that compensates for the fall of the projectile during the time of flight due to the pull of gravity.
The angle the gun or launcher much be elevated above the gun-target line.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The original reference system ([X.sub.0], [Y.sub.0], [Z.sub.0]) is defined as the reference system of the horizontal curve without superelevation, where O is the coordinate origin fixed on the ground.
Previous studies have proposed calculation methods that use the mean velocity of debris flow and the law of conservation of energy for determining the maximum superelevation of debris flow climbing ascending slopes [1].
In the meandering channel simulation, the accelerated velocity and superelevation activated by the centrifugal force at the bends were clearly presented and compared with experimental data.
Superelevation Deficiency, Superelevation Excess and Uncompensated Lateral Acceleration
According to his new model, it's far more likely that the highest flow marks reflect superelevation of a 3-to-10-m-deep flow of snow that raced around and up the side of the curve during an avalanche lasting about 23 seconds.
The Scurve failed to meet current design criteria for alignment and superelevation. In all likelihood, the substandard features were a contributing factor in many of the 91 traffic accidents that occurred on the Scurve in a single year.
He has already completed one on superelevation (the banking of highway curves) and is currently working on a tutorial on basic surveying skills.
As noted, the significant indices are grade length, horizontal curve radius, sight distance, superelevation, intersection density, and intersection sight distance.
State highway agencies also realized the need for more consistent designs, including improved sight distance, curvature, and superelevation. In 1928, the American Association of State Highway Officials (AASHO) (now the American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials) published the first "standards of practice" to promote uniformity in design.
The high torsional strength of box girder makes it particularly suitable for sharp curve alignment so as to accommodate to topography along traffic lines, skewed piers and abutment, superelevation, and transitions such as interchange ramp structures.