Superfamily

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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Superfamily

 

a taxonomic category used in the more thoroughly studied classes of animals to combine phylogenetically similar families within an order. In Latin, superfamilies are indicated by attaching the suffix “-oidea” to the name of the oldest family of the group. Thus, the superfamily Feloidea comprises the families Viverridae, Hyaenidae, and Felidae.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Detecting remote homologs allows identifying the superfamilies and families related to a given protein, which helps to understand what proteins are functionally related.
Three of these templates belong to superfamilies that are different to the superfamily of the predicted protein; see Table 3.
Three yeast superfamilies (i.e., metabolism, transcription, and cellular transport) sequences were used as a training and test dataset.
Within this group, members of the superfamilies Diaphanocephaloidea, Ancylostomatoidea, and Strongy-loidea were excluded based on morphologic features of the anterior end.
Superfamily is a set of HMM profiles built using SAM for the various superfamilies identified by SCOP.
In particular, Fraser and his colleagues have discovered the oldest definitive records of three orders of insects and many families and superfamilies.
Predicting superfamilies based on the binary classifiers that detect remote homologs has been addressed in previous works (Ding & Dubchak, 2001; Huang et al., 2003; Rangwala & Karypis, 2006; Ie et al., 2007; Leslie et al., 2007; Lin & Li, 2007; Lin, 2008).
The superfamilies covered here are Scarabaeiudea, Scritoidea, Dascilloidea, Burprestoidea, and Byrrhoidea.
The receptors and their associated peripheral G proteins underlie many physiological processes, comprise one of the largest superfamilies in the human genome, and are the target for over half of all drugs in use or development.
They have long been considered a relatively early branch of the Caelifera, a view confirmed by molecular systematic investigations which place them after the Tridactyloidea and Tetrigoidea but before the remaining superfamilies (Flook & Rowell 1997, Rowell & Flook 1998, Flook et al.
But two new studies suggest grouping receptors together into structural "superfamilies.'