supergiant star


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Related to supergiant star: Red supergiants

supergiant star:

see red giantred giant,
star that is relatively cool but very luminous because of its great size. All normal stars are expected to pass eventually through a red-giant phase as a consequence of stellar evolution.
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supergiant star

[¦sü·pər′gī·ənt ′stär]
(astronomy)
A member of the family containing the intrinsically brightest stars, populating the top of the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram; supergiant stars occur at all temperatures from 30,000 to 3000 K and have luminosities from 104 to 106 times that of the sun; the star Betelgeuse is an example.
References in periodicals archive ?
Comparison with emissions from nearby stars made it clear that this massive, hot (O-type) star had passed its youth and was now aging; it was at a stage known as a blue supergiant star and would soon face its explosive death as a supernova.
If the bar is a completely separate object, then taking into account the motion of Betelgeuse and its arcs and the separation between them and the bar, the outermost arc will collide with the bar in just 5,000 years, with the red supergiant star itself hitting the bar roughly 12,500 years later.
Then look for the supergiant star Antares just near the slim moon.
Washington, January 6 (ANI): A team of astronomers has solved a nearly two-century-old mystery of how Epsilon Aurigae, a yellow supergiant star, pulls off its lengthy disappearing act.
They also see evidence for a trail of hot, ionized gas apparently streaming from a red, supergiant star less than 1 light-year from Sgr A*.
"If this is indeed the orbital period of a stellar companion, then it's likely a giant or supergiant star between three and five times the Sun's mass," Strohmayer said.
Classified as a Cepheid variable, it is a supergiant star about 500 to 800 light-years from Earth.
A Type II supernova is caused by the core collapse of an aging, supergiant star. The outer layers of the star explode outward, while the crushed core usually becomes a neutron star.
It contains both a supergiant star and a mysterious companion.
Astronomers used to think a high-mass supergiant star was needed to account for the brightness of Epsilon Aurigae despite its great distance.
The size of these "bubbles" is also gigantic, as large as the supergiant star itself.
Astronomers attributed the low luminosity and light-curve shape to the fact that 1987A was the explosion of a comparatively compact, blue, supergiant star instead of a huge, red supergiant.