supergranules

supergranules

[¦sü·pər′gran·yülz]
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Hugh Hudson (University of California, Berkeley) has made a similar calculation by analyzing supergranules, giant convective bubbles in the photosphere.
Utilizing Uzbekistan's abundant natural gas resources as feedstock, the plant will have the capacity to produce 2,000 mtpd (metric tons per day) of ammonia and 1,750 mtpd of urea supergranules using the state-of-the art technologies and licenses from world leading companies.
Some especially massive convective structures, called supergranules, can last up to 24 hours and have diameters greater than Earth's.
Individual granules have limited lifetimes, can be arranged in mesogranules, supergranules, or giant cell [40,118-122], and seem to represent a convective process.
Larger patterns, called supergranules, are about the size of Earth and last a whole day.
Utilizing Turkmenistan's abundant natural gas resources as feedstock, the plant will have the capacity to produce 2,000 mtpd (metric tons per day) of ammonia and 3,500 mtpd of urea supergranules.
The supergranules undulate, and it's the wave they form that races ahead of the sun's rotation.
Following chapters explore the upper zone of the Sun, where convection produces the granules and supergranules visible from Earth.
Just- published data from the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) show that the high-speed solar wind streams from the edges of supergranules, Earth-size convection cells that move magnetic fields around as the hot gases in them rise and fall like boiling molasses.
The charged particles are linked to the Sun through the heliospheric magnetic field, which in turn is tied to the supergranules. If the supergranules' motion is not random but due instead to the superposition of many g-modes, these oscillations could be transmitted to the particles via waves propagating along the field lines.
Unsuspecting students are suddenly asked to remember the difference between Wolf-Rayet and T Tauri stars, X-ray bursters and gamma-ray bursters, the s-process and the r-process, and Type I and Type II supernovae -- not to mention supergranules, superclusters, superconductivity, superfluidity, supersymmetry, supergravity, and superstrings.