superheavy element


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Related to superheavy element: Superheavy atom

superheavy element

[¦sü·pər′hev·ē ′el·ə·mənt]
(inorganic chemistry)
A chemical element with an atomic number of 110 or greater.
References in periodicals archive ?
Almost all heavy elements decay quickly, but scientists are excited because superheavy elements such as 116, 117 and 118 don't vanish as quickly as other superheavies.
Thanks to the discovery of six new variations, or isotopes, of the superheavy elements on the periodic table's bottom rung, scientists are closer to creating superheavy elements that are stable enough to study in depth.
While nobelium itself is not a superheavy element, the improved understanding of its isotopes could "provide reliable anchor points en route to the island of stability," the team wrote in Nature.
However, Flerov says, "the assumption that the anomalous tracks detected belong to the cosmic-ray nuclei of superheavy elements remains unproved ...."
The 109 papers include the opening session and sessions on nuclear structure, experiments and theory of superheavy elements, radioactive ion beams and new facilities, mass measurements, fission, and nuclear astrophysics.
Sandulescu, "Shell effects in the fragmentation potential for superheavy elements," Romanian Journal of Physics, vol.
Element 118 will be named oganesson, or Og, after Yuri Oganessian, a Russian physicist who contributed to the discovery of several superheavy elements.
The discovery caps a decade of work at RIKEN's Linear Accelerator Facility, where the group, dedicated to exploring superheavy elements, set out to create the element by bombarding a thin layer of bismuth with zinc ions traveling at 10 percent of the speed of light.
These data were however obtained for, mainly, stable isotopes and numerous other radioactive isotopes that makes further interpolation of these properties onto superheavy elements quite complicate.
Both groups synthesized the elements by slamming lighter nuclei into each other and tracking the decay of the radioactive superheavy elements that followed.