supermassive star


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supermassive star

[¦sü·pər′mas·iv ′stär]
(astronomy)
A star with a mass exceeding about 50 times that of the sun.
References in periodicals archive ?
However, a new research, led by a team at the University of Surrey, United Kingdom, suggested a different scenario, one in which supermassive star weighing several thousand times more than our sun held the job of element production.
Dr Phil Cigan, another of the Cardiff astronomers, said: "The two explosions seem to differ from each other, perhaps because Cas A results from the explosion of a rare supermassive star."
(The gas might or might not first form a supermassive star.) With masses so much greater than those created by Population-III stars, direct-collapse seeds offer an attractive alternative, explains Muhammad Latif (Paris Institute of Astrophysics).
In the first part of the project, I will compute the impact of stellar feedback from the supermassive star and follow the time evolution of the mass accretion rates.
When a supermassive star dies and collapses in on itself, it creates a black hole that pulls in nearby matter, energy, and even light.
In over 50 papers contributors memorialize Gamov and his theories and address the phenomenology of brane-world cosmological models, black holes, gravitational wave experiments, supernova explosions, axisymmetric stationary flows in compact objects, the higher co-dimension brane-world, ghost stellar fields as a dark energy, the rotating universe, quantum scattering on a cosmic string, line-driven winds near compact objects, weak magnetism effects, the trans-sonic propeller stage, high-energy neutrinos from a collapsing supermassive star, star complexes and starburst clumps in spiral galaxies, a model of nonthermal radiation of a shell-type supernova remnant, space mission Rosetta, and the detection and properties of a near-earth flux of dark electric matter objects.
Flaunting a pair of nearly mirror-image, dusty gas clouds that ballooned into space in opposite directions, the supermassive star known as Eta Carinae has fascinated astronomers ever since (SN: 2/2/91, p.
The most likely source of aluminum-26 is a long-gone supermassive star, whose internal nuclear reactions would have created the element.
Type II supernovas emit lots of hydrogen and are thought to form when the core of a supermassive star collapses, generating a shock wave that triggers an explosion.
A black hole is what remains after a supermassive star dies.
At a distance of 7,500 light-years, Eta Carinae is the closest example of a supermassive star. But despite its staggering luminosity, Eta Carinae is shrouded in secrecy--literally.
Second is a supermassive star with a black hole in its center, which Ozernoy calls "an unstable system' --to say the least.