superplasticity


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superplasticity

[¦sü·pər·pla′stis·əd·ē]
(metallurgy)
The unusual ability of some metals and alloys to elongate uniformly by thousands of percent at elevated temperatures, much like hot polymers or glasses.

Superplasticity

The unusual ability of some metals and alloys to elongate uniformly thousands of percent at elevated temperatures, much like hot polymers or glasses. Under normal creep conditions, conventional alloys do not stretch uniformly, but form a necked-down region and then fracture after elongations of only 100% or less. The most important requirements for obtaining superplastic behavior include a very small metal grain size, a well-rounded (equiaxed) grain shape, a deformation temperature greater than one-half the melting point, and a slow deformation rate. See Alloy, Creep (materials), Eutectics

Superplasticity is important to technology primarily because large amounts of deformation can be produced under low loads. Thus, conventional metal-shaping processes (for example, rolling, forging, and extrusion) can be conducted with smaller, and cheaper equipment. Nonconventional forming methods can also be used; for instance, vacuum-forming techniques, borrowed from the plastics industry, have been applied to sheet metal to form car panels, refrigerator door linings, and TV chassis parts. See Metal forming

References in periodicals archive ?
Since we have already discussed Marten-sitic Transformations and Twinning, we would like to briefly discuss the Superplasticity or Pseudoplasticity phenomenon.
International Conference on Superplasticity in Advanced Materials (12th: 2015: Tokyo, Japan) Edited by Eiichi Sato, Goroh Itoh, Yoshimasa Takayama, Koichi Kitazono, Koji Morita, Takaomi Itoi, and Junya Kobayashi
1996) Strength, ductility and superplasticity of microcrystalline two-phase materials.
Author John Martin includes new information on emerging topics, such as superplasticity and the Bauschinger Effect, and expanded coverage of organic polymers.
The nano regime has rich potential for offering useful new materials characteristics including enhanced strength and hardness, reduced resistivity, superplasticity, self-assembly, enhanced catalytic intensity, and increased magnetic and dielectric performance, to name a few.
Friction Stir Superplasticity for Unitized Structures
Papers address the effects, properties, optimization, fabrication, heat treatment and deformation, superplasticity, preparation, characterization, synthesis, processing, crystallization behavior, structure, numerical simulation, and other aspects of various materials.
Three invited talks report on advances in superplasticity in ceramics, structural effects on the plastic behavior of highly porous glasses, and grain size strengthening in microcrystalline copper.