Supine

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Supine

 

a nominal (nonpredicative) verb form in Latin; the term also refers to functionally or etymologically similar forms in Rumanian, Moldavian, and a number of Slavic languages, including Old Church Slavonic, Old Czech, Slovene, and Lower Wendish. In Latin, the supine in the accusative functions as an adverb, for example, miserunt consultum (“they sent to ask”). In the ablative, it functions as an object attached to an adjective, for example, iucundus cognitu (“pleasing to know”). In the Slavic languages, the supine functions as an adverbial modifier of purpose, for example, in Old Church Slavonic cheso vidĕt” izidete (“what have you come out to see?”).

References in periodicals archive ?
Till from the occasional relief it was supineness becomes habitual and finally the rule.
By implication, Sohl presents Russian occupation of the USA as a pathological as well as a political state, which reflects the prevalence of the discourse of political 'health' during the Cold War and also anticipates Oliver Lange's attack on national supineness in Vandenberg (1971: retitled Defiance: An American Novel in 1984).
Certainly, he must have known that by insulting the media's supposed supineness before the administration, he was also insulting the administration, though in the presence of both his targets he was able at least to this extent to leave his assumption of the latter's malfeasances unspoken and so to pay his deference to the lighthearted spirit of the occasion.
Spirit represents the ideal we seek, usually through individual contemplative asceticism, supineness to the church, and reconciliation to that which exists in the physical world.