Supine

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Supine

 

a nominal (nonpredicative) verb form in Latin; the term also refers to functionally or etymologically similar forms in Rumanian, Moldavian, and a number of Slavic languages, including Old Church Slavonic, Old Czech, Slovene, and Lower Wendish. In Latin, the supine in the accusative functions as an adverb, for example, miserunt consultum (“they sent to ask”). In the ablative, it functions as an object attached to an adjective, for example, iucundus cognitu (“pleasing to know”). In the Slavic languages, the supine functions as an adverbial modifier of purpose, for example, in Old Church Slavonic cheso vidĕt” izidete (“what have you come out to see?”).

References in periodicals archive ?
Wh extraction may apply over recursively embedded supines (see Grosu and Horvath 1987):
Unlike other adjectives of the tough class, bun `good' exhibits agreement marks in constructions with de supines, as in (i).
This paper aims to clarify the categorial and syntactic status of supine forms in Romanian.
With respect to morphology, one has to define the process that accounts for the supine form.
Clausal supine must have a prepositional subordinator; that is de `of' in most cases:
De `of' may not select a nominalized supine when it functions as a sentential complement: (2)
Derivational morphology yields a specific class of nouns that have sprung from the supine form.
Most deverbal nouns based on the supine have a corresponding regular noun.
Supine nouns contrast with the class of infinitive and regular nouns as follows: (4)
Indefinite articles modify infinitive nouns, as in (5b), but not supine nouns, as in (5a).
Plural is possible with infinitive nouns, as in (5d), but not with supine nouns, as in (5c).
As a consequence of the restrictions in (5a) and (5c), other indefinite modifiers are incompatible with supine nouns, as in (5e).