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CARE

(Cooperative for Assistance and Relief Everywhere), nonprofit, nonsectarian federation of agencies devoted to channeling relief and self-help materials to needy people in foreign countries. Organized in the United States (1945) to help war-ravaged Europe, CARE soon expanded its program to include developing nations in Asia, Africa, and Latin America. Famous for its "CARE packages" of food and other necessities, CARE in now also involved in population, health care, land management, and small economic activity. It is now an international organization with 10 member countries and headquarters in Brussels.

care

  1. the work involved in supporting people who, because of physical frailty chronic illness or other forms of incapacity and disability, are incapable of leading an autonomous existence.
  2. other kinds of carework, e.g. in child-rearing (see CHILD CARE) and DOMESTIC LABOUR. This should be distinguished from care in sense 1.
Care in sense 1 operates over a wide range of social relations. A clear dividing line can be drawn between formal and informal care (see Abrams, 1978) as it exists in contemporary industrial societies. Formal care refers to services provided by agents of organization (statutory, voluntary and/or private) to people within clearly defined categories of need. Informal care is personally directed towards certain people who have a social relationship with their carer - usually a family member, and most often a spouse (Parker, 1993), or female relative.

Feminist sociologists (see also FEMINISM) have had a major impact on the understanding of care and caring relationships. They have argued that caring is ‘a gendered concept’ and that women constitute the majority of carers both informally, in the private sphere, and as low-paid care workers (‘care assistants’) in the formal sector (Finch and Groves, 1982; Ungerson, 1987; Lewis and Meredith, 1988). Studies of caring have examined the complex reasons why women care and the particular problems and difficulties they face. Social policies involving decarceration and COMMUNITY CARE, the decline of neighbour-hood and COMMUNITY associated with increasing SOCIAL (and geographical) MOBILITY, have placed an increasing burden on individual women carers. There is some evidence that women are reluctant to enter caring relationships with female relatives but lack viable alternatives (Cotterill, 1994). Recent research using data from the 1980 British General Household Survey has also pointed to the significant contribution made by male carers, particularly men who care for their wives (Arber and Gilbert, 1989).

care, custody, and control

Describes a standard exclusion in liability insurance policies. Under this exclusion, the liability insurance does not apply to damage to property in the care or custody of the insured, or to damage to property over which the insured is for any purpose exercising physical control.

CARE

agency devoted to channeling relief to needy people abroad. [Am. Hist.: NCE, 456]

care

in (or into) care Social welfare made the legal responsibility of a local authority by order of a court
References in periodicals archive ?
Extension of the building for consultations and supportive care.
This study is unique in that it aims to not only capture more commonly employed interventions such as supportive care, surgical debridement, intravenous immunoglobulin [IVIG], and corticosteroids but also newer modalities that coincide with our improved understanding of the pathogenesis of the disease, such as the use of cyclosporine and biologies," said Mr.
Cancer supportive care products are mainly used in the treatment of adverse effects associated with cancer therapy as well as for treatment of symptoms and signs of cancer, such as chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting, chemotherapy induced neutropenia and anemia, bone metastasis, hair loss, etc.
They compared their results to those of 11 patients who received only supportive care.
The term supportive care has been increasingly embraced by renal clinicians (Berzoff, Swantkowski, & Cohen, 2008) as the term implies active treatment with positive implications rather than palliation, which may imply that death is immediately imminent (Davison & Jhangri, 2010).
The following major recommendations from the conference included: *The need for supportive care for kidney patients is equal to that for cancer patients and should be available based on need, not prognosis, for patients at any stage of kidney disease.
The oncology supportive care unit comprises two approved products that are now marketed in the US.
ASyMS has the ability to enhance the care provided to people with long term conditions by remotely monitoring their supportive care needs while they are at home, and providing real time communication of this information to health professionals involved in their care.
The researchers found that clot size in patients treated with either dose shrunk by more than half, compared to only 1 percent in patients who received only supportive care.
Supportive care for cancer patients, as Ettinger (Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins) explains in his foreword, is "for symptoms related to the cancer and/or its treatment; physical, psychosocial, and emotional issues associated with the cancer; and, finally, end-of-life decisions.
This Phase III trial was conducted to compare single-agent cetuximab plus best supportive care in a total of 572 patients with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-expressing metastatic colorectal cancer who had previously been treated with 5-fluorouracil or another thymidylate synthase inhibitor, and who had failed irinotecan and oxaliplatin.
For several years, ONS and the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer (MASCC) have maintained an informal liaison relationship.

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