suppressor gene


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Related to suppressor gene: lethal gene, suppressor mutation

suppressor gene

[sə′pres·ər ‚jēn]
(genetics)
A gene that reverses the effect of a mutation in another gene.
References in periodicals archive ?
Newly identified germline variations in a key tumor suppressor gene predispose individuals to develop leukemia as children and leave them with a 1-in-4 chance of developing a second cancer later.
Most tumours occur as a result of the activation of oncogenes and/or inactivation of pro-apoptotic or tumour suppressor genes.
The transcription factor Rb, a known tumor suppressor gene, reduced expression in a small percentage of oral tumours.
The company added that its Phase 2 study is based on preclinical work showing that SGI-110 is effective in inducing global DNA and gene specific hypomethylation, thus enabling the re-expression of tumor suppressor genes in HCC cell lines.
According to STRICKER & KUMAR (2008), the tumor suppressor gene p53 is one of the most commonly involved in different neoplastic processes in human beings and which in over 70% of neoplasias show certain mutation in this gene (MORO et al.
In recent years he has become more interested in targeting the oncogene P53 tumor suppressor gene, developed a therapy (PSJ53 therapy), and had some important success.
In the women whose biopsy results did not indicate cancer, methylation of another tumor suppressor gene, called SFRP1, was more common in milk from the biopsied breast than the other breast.
The tumor suppressor gene p53 appears to play a key role in keeping cells healthy and preventing them from starting the abnormal growth that is a hallmark of cancer.
Researchers examined three specific genetic alterations in prostate cancer samples from 308 patients: Loss of the PTEN tumor suppressor gene, and rearrangement of two others--the ERG or ETV1 genes.
By activating a cancer suppressor gene, a small molecule called nutlin-3a can block cancer cell division, according to researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI), part of the National Institutes of Health.
This approach has shown promise, for example, in our INGN 401 program, in which the FUS-1 tumor suppressor gene is administered intravenously to patients with metastatic lung cancers.