suppressor gene


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Related to suppressor gene: lethal gene, suppressor mutation

suppressor gene

[sə′pres·ər ‚jēn]
(genetics)
A gene that reverses the effect of a mutation in another gene.
References in periodicals archive ?
A total of 1217 known tumor suppressor genes was searched from the tumor suppressor gene database (TSGene 2.0) [8, 9].
Most tumours occur as a result of the activation of oncogenes and/or inactivation of pro-apoptotic or tumour suppressor genes. Epigenetics, e.g.
Recessive changes- Those occur in growth-inhibitory pathway genes or commonly in tumor suppressor genes causing loss of function.
Mutations of tumor suppressor gene P53 (TP53) in tumor tissue and cellular urine sediments in urinary bladder cancer.
In recent years he has become more interested in targeting the oncogene P53 tumor suppressor gene, developed a therapy (PSJ53 therapy), and had some important success.
MDS has exclusive rights to the tumour suppressor gene HLS5, both as a potential therapeutic target and also underpinning its involvement in a variety of diseases.
When the researchers measured cells in breast milk from 13 women who turned out to have cancer, these cells had substantially more methylation in a tumor suppressor gene called RASSF1 than did cells from the noncancerous breast.
The tumor suppressor gene p53 appears to play a key role in keeping cells healthy and preventing them from starting the abnormal growth that is a hallmark of cancer.
The gene is a tumor suppressor gene, the deletion or inactivation of which can initiate prostate carcinogenesis, and enhance the probability of cancer progression.
Researchers examined three specific genetic alterations in prostate cancer samples from 308 patients: Loss of the PTEN tumor suppressor gene, and rearrangement of two others--the ERG or ETV1 genes.
Lead researcher Dr Paul Edwards said: "NRG1 could be the most important tumour suppressor gene discovery in the last 20 years as it gives us vital information about a new mechanism that causes breast cancer."
By activating a cancer suppressor gene, a small molecule called nutlin-3a can block cancer cell division, according to researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI), part of the National Institutes of Health.