surface inversion

surface inversion

[′sər·fəs in‚vər·zhən]
(meteorology)
A temperature inversion based at the earth's surface; that is, an increase of temperature with height beginning at ground level. Also known as ground inversion.

surface inversion

A meteorological phenomenon in which the temperature inversion commences at the surface of the earth or the sea. Surface inversions occur mostly at night and are caused by the cooling of the air near the surface by terrestrial radiation.
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References in periodicals archive ?
For example, the strength of a surface inversion has been suggested to enhance Arctic amplification, by suppressing the cooling caused by longwave radiation escaping to space during the winter half of the year (Bintanja et al.
During cloud-free winter conditions, strong surface inversions form due to longwave surface cooling, while low clouds tend to generate elevated cloud-top inversions due longwave cloud-top cooling (e.
Surface inversions determine the direction and magnitude of turbulent fluxes in the atmospheric boundary layer (e.
In winter, when the surface inversion is strong (Wendler and Nicpon, 1975), the surface layer is semi-decoupled from the winds aloft, and the minimum wind speed of 1.
1a), and a certain degree of wind shear, both progressively decreasing during the night, along with a surface inversion between 35m and 2m growing during the first hours and staying close to 2-3K until the end of the night (Fig.
Many of the nights were affected by easterly katabatic winds which increased the wind shear and eroded the surface inversion, soon after the sunset.
This implies that a weaker surface inversion became established downstream of the crater, assuming similar conditions at the inversion top.
The sloshing of the surface inversion was visualized by the infrared cameras on the crater rim (Fig.

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