surface retention

surface retention

[′sər·fəs ri‚ten·chən]
(hydrology)
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Surface retention of stubbles provides shading to prevent evaporation of moisture from soil and reduce vapour diffusion to the atmosphere (Sharma and Kumar, 2014).
Surface retention of the biocide activates the hydrogel, which effectively holds fouling organisms at bay, cutting friction to a minimum while utilising a minimum amount of biocide.
The material, HiCap, vastly outperforms today's best adsorbents, which perform surface retention of solid or gas molecules, atoms or ions.
They do not blur vision but have a short ocular surface retention time.
Sodium hyaluronate is a mucopolysaccharide with high viscosity, good ocular surface retention time and is beneficial to wound healing.
Meanwhile, interest in feminine hygiene centers on tampon applicator technology, improved surface retention, better fit and increased absorbency.
Southern yellow pine, treated to full penetration, would likely produce samples that are lower in borate surface retention than typical commercial lumber or refractory species, since the same overall retention would be achieved with less penetration.
Currently, manufacturers adding borates target a retention between 0.1 and 0.3 percent boric acid overall, which gives a higher surface retention, due to water movement during drying.
This paper examines humic acid effects on CCA leaching in the laboratory and compares CCA surface retention and mass balances in red pine utility poles installed in wet, organic sites and well-drained control sites.
The pH of the water was not significantly related to surface retentions. The chromium mass balance in this zone increased with age and decreased with increased humic acid concentration.