surface wave


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surface wave

[′sər·fəs ‚wāv]
(communications)
(electromagnetism)
A wave that can travel along an interface between two different mediums without radiation; the interface must be essentially straight in the direction of propagation; the commonest interface used is that between air and the surface of a circular wire.
(fluid mechanics)
A wave that distorts the free surface that separates two fluid phases, usually a liquid and a gas.
(mechanics)
(oceanography)
A progressive gravity wave in which the disturbance is of greatest amplitude at the air-water interface.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

surface wave

The part of a radio transmission that follows the earth's surface. The same as a ground wave. See space wave.
An Illustrated Dictionary of Aviation Copyright © 2005 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved
References in periodicals archive ?
He, "Validation of RADARSAT-2 fully polarimetric SAR measurements of ocean surface waves," Journal of Geophysical Research Oceans, vol.
In this research, the HIS structure was introduced to suppress the surface wave of the microstrip antenna whereby the HIS elements were mounted around the radiating patch of the antenna.
Sambuelli, "Application of FK analysis of surface waves for geotechnical characterization," in Proceedings of the Proc.
(2008) Character istics of ambient seismic noise as a source for surface wave tomography.
[26] found the dispersion characteristics of transverse surface waves in piezoelectric coupled solid media with hard metal interlayer.
Surface waves carry a lot of information about the Earth's crust and dispersion analysis of surface waves is concerned with the phase velocity and wave number.
Microwave C-band (5.5 GHz, 5.6 cm wavelength) backscatter is more reliable for studying ocean surface waves than shorter wavelength Ku-, Ka-, and X-bands.
(ii) By comparing Figures 1-30, it was found that the surface wave velocity has the same behavior in both media.
This assumption is valid at the threshold of ripple formation, when the amplitude of observed surface wave is small.
In Figure 4, the heavy speed of ocean surface wave R(s) is generated by applying the sinusoidal wave or Fourier representation to function signal generator and importing it into IM-PID controller [G.sub.IMC](s).
Edinburgh, UK), and Lakhtakia (engineering science & mechanics, Pennsylvania State U.) present this niche text on electromagnetic surface waves. After a general introduction to surface waves, their taxonomy, and a general theory of surface wave propagation, chapters treat plasmon-polariton waves, Dyakonov waves, Tamm waves, and hybrid Dyakonov-Tamm waves, specifying the circumstances which generate them.

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