surface weather observation

surface weather observation

[′sər·fəs ′weth·ər ‚äb·zər‚vā·shən]
(meteorology)
An evaluation of the state of the atmosphere as observed from a point at the surface of the earth, as opposed to an upper-air observation, and applied mainly to observations which are taken for the primary purpose of preparing surface synoptic charts.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

surface weather observation

An aviation weather report describing the weather conditions at a specified location and at a specified time, as observed from the ground. Regular observations are made on the hour, and special observations are made as necessary to report a significant change in the weather.
An Illustrated Dictionary of Aviation Copyright © 2005 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved
References in periodicals archive ?
Fletcher supports a CN3S partnership with the FAA and its Aviation Surface Weather Observation Network Technology Refresh staff, helping integrate the new Automated Weather Observing System Model-C.
"Quality control schemes and its application to automatic surface weather observation system." Plateau Meteorology (in Chinese) 5 (2009): 029.
The 0755 automated aviation surface weather observation (Metar) for Salmon indicated calm winds, one statute mile visibility, an overcast ceiling of 1600 feet, a temperature of minus six degrees Celsius, a dew point of minus eight degrees Celsius, and an altimeter setting of 30.04 inches.
The Vaisala sensors would be integrated into the system, which serves as the primary surface weather observation network in the United States.
Specifically, the Global Upper Air and Surface Weather Observations from the National Center for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) are collected for the evaluation of near surface temperature and humidity forecasts.
Surface weather observations in the United States began on the East Coast in the late seventeenth century (Fiebrich 2009).
Routine surface weather observations are collected in Mississippi by the National Weather Service, Federal Aviation Administration, military bases, individual airports, U.S.
Ships of opportunity - seagoing vessels that cross the oceans on other business that can incidentally make surface weather observations - have been used for decades to collect data that would be prohibitively expensive to gather any other way.
Surface weather observations were transmitted every three hours, and "upper airs" - from instrumented balloon data - every six hours.
The World Meteorological Organization provides the framework for an evolving worldwide suite of observing systems, such as satellites, radars, and surface weather observations that aid in monitoring these conditions.