decompression

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decompression

[dē·kəm′presh·ən]
(engineering)
Any procedure for the relief of pressure or compression.

decompression

The reduction of atmospheric pressure. Particularly, various techniques for preventing decompression sickness (also called caisson disease by gradual decompression. Decompression sickness is caused by the evolution of nitrogen bubbles in the body as a result of the effects of reduced atmospheric pressure. Normal symptoms of decompression sickness are the bends, chokes, and creeps; unconsciousness; and neurological symptoms. It can be potentially fatal if the original higher pressure is not restored. Fighter crews use pressure suits and pressure breathing to avoid the effects of decompression sickness. A sudden decrease in cabin pressure, which may be the result of either some component of the aircraft—such as doors, windows, or the cockpit canopy—giving way or a rupture taking place in the structure, is called explosive decompression. See also chokes and creeps.

decompression

The restoration of compressed data back to their original size. See data compression.
References in periodicals archive ?
Sensory Outcomes of All Nerves After Surgical Decompression.
This was a retrospective review of 31 cases involving NF-1 patients with symptomatic cervical spine neurofibromas who underwent surgical decompression and tumor resection from February 2001 to July 2011 at Lady Reading Hospital Peshawar.
Chiropractors and other manual therapists may have a significant role to play in not only recognizing the condition but also administering a trial of conservative therapy in the hopes of eliminating their symptoms and decreasing the need for surgical decompression.
Root canal retreatment of 11 with apical closure using MTA and conventional root canal treatment in 12 followed by surgical decompression of the lesion was planned.
If patients do not have sufficient pain relief from conservative therapies (relief that enables them to return to normal daily function), surgical decompression of the nerve is indicated.
Management of spinal epidural abscesses is either conservatively with antibiotics alone or urgent surgical decompression (8), followed by long course of intravenous and/or oral antibiotics (5,9).
Efficacy of surgical decompression in regard to motor recovery in the setting of conus medullaris injury.
The rest of the guidelines discusses the evidence for surgical interventions including surgical decompression, lumbar fusion, the addition of instrumentation to these methods, and the long-term result of surgical management.
For refractory cases, surgical decompression will likely be required.
Definitive management of this condition is the prompt surgical decompression of the abdomen followed by temporary abdominal closure.
Surgical decompression in the legs includes a tarsal tunnel release and neurolysis of the peroneal and tibial nerves.