survival curve


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survival curve

[sər′vī·vəl ‚kərv]
(nucleonics)
The curve obtained by plotting the number or percentage of organisms surviving at a given time against the dose of radiation, or the number surviving at different intervals after a particular dose of radiation.
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Figure 2 presents a comparison between each survival curve estimated by the final parametric models candidates (Weibull and logistic) and the Kaplan-Meier non-parametric model, showing a good fit to the data.
The predicted survival curve of the home-to-work travel duration of Program A
Kaplan-Meier survival curves were used to visually compare the survival status of all elderly subjects stratified by length of stay.
where: the slope tg[beta] of eqn.6 is a direct measure of the slope (1/[sigma]) of the survival curves; therefore, tg[beta] is the seed deterioration rate under any storage condition, as expressed by the angular coefficient of the survival curve, as follows:
As expected, Figures 5-7 demonstrate that the survival curve and the killed and cancer cell populations are greater when repopulation and sub-lethal repair are considered.
The Kaplan-Meier estimation method was used to compare survival curves between racial groups--black and white men.
To determine the differences in graft survival rates between high and low income ineligibles, we constructed Kaplan-Meier survival curves for each ineligible income quartile (Figure 1).
The survival curve for the major deck types without observed improvement, ranked from highest to lowest in terms of survival probability, is as follows: precast concrete panels, cast-in-place concrete, corrugated steel, and wood.
Efficacy criteria were the 48-hour cumulative stool weight/kg of body weight, time to recovery, proportion of children with no more diarrhea (survival curve) by treatment day, number of formed stool/day, number of watery stool/day, and percentage of anal irritation.
We modeled the time that bears remained on the river, in the presence and absence of humans, using survival analysis and the Kaplan-Meier estimate of the survival curve (Fleming and Harrington, 1991).
Bleyer and associates also plotted the data to reflect a plateau in the survival curve of patients in various age groups using probability analysis.
To estimate r and s the survival curve can be transformed into an inverse Gaussian distribution,