survivor curve

survivor curve

[sər′vī·vər ‚kərv]
(industrial engineering)
A curve showing the percentage of a group of machines or facilities surviving at a given age.
References in periodicals archive ?
Figure 2 shows that Equation (10), with [A.sub.1] set to 16.7, generally fits the shape of the experimentally determined survivor curve, and is close to all data at moisture contents above 0.4 since the heat of desorption is very low at high moisture contents.
The Weibull distribution of life duration provides a statistical description of survivor curve tailing.
The expectancy life factor quantifies the consumption of productive capability during asset useful life through the consideration of economic and survivor curve theory.
The article referenced Iowa-type survivor curves and depreciation behavior as measured by the expectancy life factor.
The survivor curve for the couple lies above the individual survival curves, indicating that the probability of at least one member of the couple surviving to a given age is larger than that of a single individual.
The first step in the survivor analysis process is the estimation of the survivor curve from the observed retirement activity.
The author proposes the use of survivor curve concepts and economic theory to address asset value reductions brought about by declining service life.
Areas of study include property service-life forecasting, depreciation estimation, and valuation of industrial property as of the following: Service Life Studies IOWA CURVES Survivor curves Net Salvage Studies Development of Depreciation Rates Assessment of Depreciation Reserves Estimation of Asset Retirement Obligations (SFAS 143 and FIN 47) Periodic studies of depreciation rates and practices are well overdue for NYPA so that the most current service life experience, net salvage trends, replacement activity, and technological and economic developments may be properly reflected in annual depreciation.
Figure 1 exhibits that there were differences among survivor curves of age category, initial weight, TB patient category, and HIV status for TB patients.
The D10 values--the decimal reduction time, the time required at a certain temperature to kill 90% of an organism--were calculated as a negative reciprocal of the slope of the survivor curves and were reported as mean values plus or minus standard deviation.
Generally, there are two categories of procedures related to the application of analytical methods for estimating contract rights remaining useful life: 1) estimation of a historical attrition rate and 2) development of survivor curves based on historical attrition rates.