care

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CARE

(Cooperative for Assistance and Relief Everywhere), nonprofit, nonsectarian federation of agencies devoted to channeling relief and self-help materials to needy people in foreign countries. Organized in the United States (1945) to help war-ravaged Europe, CARE soon expanded its program to include developing nations in Asia, Africa, and Latin America. Famous for its "CARE packages" of food and other necessities, CARE in now also involved in population, health care, land management, and small economic activity. It is now an international organization with 10 member countries and headquarters in Brussels.

care

  1. the work involved in supporting people who, because of physical frailty chronic illness or other forms of incapacity and disability, are incapable of leading an autonomous existence.
  2. other kinds of carework, e.g. in child-rearing (see CHILD CARE) and DOMESTIC LABOUR. This should be distinguished from care in sense 1.
Care in sense 1 operates over a wide range of social relations. A clear dividing line can be drawn between formal and informal care (see Abrams, 1978) as it exists in contemporary industrial societies. Formal care refers to services provided by agents of organization (statutory, voluntary and/or private) to people within clearly defined categories of need. Informal care is personally directed towards certain people who have a social relationship with their carer - usually a family member, and most often a spouse (Parker, 1993), or female relative.

Feminist sociologists (see also FEMINISM) have had a major impact on the understanding of care and caring relationships. They have argued that caring is ‘a gendered concept’ and that women constitute the majority of carers both informally, in the private sphere, and as low-paid care workers (‘care assistants’) in the formal sector (Finch and Groves, 1982; Ungerson, 1987; Lewis and Meredith, 1988). Studies of caring have examined the complex reasons why women care and the particular problems and difficulties they face. Social policies involving decarceration and COMMUNITY CARE, the decline of neighbour-hood and COMMUNITY associated with increasing SOCIAL (and geographical) MOBILITY, have placed an increasing burden on individual women carers. There is some evidence that women are reluctant to enter caring relationships with female relatives but lack viable alternatives (Cotterill, 1994). Recent research using data from the 1980 British General Household Survey has also pointed to the significant contribution made by male carers, particularly men who care for their wives (Arber and Gilbert, 1989).

care, custody, and control

Describes a standard exclusion in liability insurance policies. Under this exclusion, the liability insurance does not apply to damage to property in the care or custody of the insured, or to damage to property over which the insured is for any purpose exercising physical control.

CARE

agency devoted to channeling relief to needy people abroad. [Am. Hist.: NCE, 456]

care

in (or into) care Social welfare made the legal responsibility of a local authority by order of a court
References in periodicals archive ?
Therefore, the purpose of the article to put forth a rationale for integrating exercise and MBSR interventions for optimizing survivorship care.
2 Release of their groundbreaking software that features four key solutions for: Distress/Symptom Management, Treatment Planning, Survivorship Care Planning, and Electronic Patient-Reported Outcomes (e-PRO).
Implementing core competency training for primary care providers that includes survivorship care might also increase comfort and knowledge, and would leverage new educational and other resources that have become available for general practitioners (National Cancer Survivorship Resource Center 2014; Nekhlyudov and Wenger 2014).
In order to move forward in our understanding and ability to determine meaningful intervention targets and outcomes for cancer survivorship care, global consensus should be reached regarding evidence-based definitions of cancer survivor and cancer survivorship.
3) A Canadian GU survivorship meeting held in 2011 highlighted the urgent need for improved GU survivorship care.
So, in the July/August issue of CA: A Cancer Journal for Clinicians, the ACS published recommendations to guide prostate cancer survivorship care.
To promote cancer survivorship as a growing public health concern, CDC is cosponsoring the 7th Biennial Cancer Survivorship Research Conference, "Advancing Survivorship Care Through Multilevel Collaborations," June 18-20, 2014, in Atlanta, Georgia (http://www.
We need a conversation to take place where cancer patients are engaged in setting their survivorship care goals," Dr.
Every patient is different, so the best way to approach survivorship care is to give access to a programme that will empower them, with access to health professionals when they need it, and the information to help them cope.
Unfortunately, survivorship care is often overlooked, and healthcare providers fail to include potential latent chronic problems resulting from the cancer treatment in their patient education interventions.
Individuals diagnosed with high survival cancers will often die of cardiovascular disease (CVD) rather than a recurrence of their cancer, yet CVD risk factors may be overlooked during survivorship care.
Three sections outline what the practitioner needs to know about survivorship, implementing effective survivorship care in practice, and using Fleishman's five-point LEARN System--Living, Education, Activity, Rest and sleep, Nutrition--framework to help patients organize their efforts.