sustained yield


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sustained yield

[sə′stānd ′yēld]
(biology)
In a biological resource such as timber or grain, the replacement of a harvest yield by growth or reproduction before another harvest occurs.
References in periodicals archive ?
'When you do the economics correctly, you end up with higher net returns from fishing, and the potential for increased resilience of fish stocks compared to those managed for maximum sustained yield.'
In the second trial (Table 2), TZSTRI109 to TZSTRI117 sustained yield losses varying from 6 to 27%, which were similar to or lower than that of the resistant check inbred line, 9450 (30%).
The Trust has made progress in meeting its goals to preserve and protect the Caldera for future generations as well as to provide for public recreation and sustained yield management.
This legislation defined several terms including "intensive management," "harvestable surplus," "high level of harvest," "identified big game prey populations," and "sustained yield." The intent of the legislation was to direct the Board to choose areas where predator and habitat management would be used to attain and sustain high levels of harvest.
These lands are regulated for sustained yield of warbler nesting habitat and timber production.
Based on published sustained-yield tables (McCullough 1979; Downing and Guynn 1985), deer populations in the farmland region may currently exist at 35-40% of ecological carrying capacity, while the deer herd in the hill country may be near maximum sustained yield (MSY; 56% of ecological carrying capacity).
Immediately, the Environmental Protection Information Center (EPIC) in Garberville and the Sierra Club filed suit against the California Department of Forestry (CDF), the state Fish and Game department (DFG), and MAXXAM/PL over the deal's 120-year Sustained Yield Plan, which governs some 210,000 acres of forest.
Because Homer does not own its own forests, it is dependent upon its trading partners to exercise the best harvesting and sustained yield practices that are feasible.
For example, in questioning the assumptions of sustainable development (e.g., its continued focus on economic growth), and criticising its utilitarian and calculative tendencies (e.g., the belief that forests can be harvested at a rate of maximum sustained yield), the book reiterates the arguments of others (e.g.
This revolution cannot be piecemeal: incremental changes, such as adding awareness of ecological constraints to the conventional model of multiple use and sustained yield, are not enough.
These "new" sources of timber altered both the calculations of how much wood there was in the Pacific region, and the meaning of "sustained yield." Moreover, the emergence of the pulp industry in BC's interior regions opened up a whole new forest resource for exploitation.
For example, sustained yield began as a "philosophy of conservative resource husbanding," but the Forest Service transformed it into a "philosophy of wealth maximization" (41).